bailoun

The Legal Content Curator: How Does Neil Gorsuch Approach Legal Questions?

Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court nominee slated to replace the late Justice Scalia, is no stranger to questions of life and death. His 2009 book, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, looks carefully at the historical trajectory of the current movement in the United States for the right to die, and argues "that all human beings are intrinsically valuable and the intentional taking of human life by private persons is always wrong." Gorsuch, who completed his doctoral degree in philosophy at Oxford, bases his argument on secular moral theory and common law. Much of Gorsuch's way of thinking about…

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Ms. Pre-JD: How Important is ‘Fun’?

At a panel hosted by the Columbia Undergraduate Law Review, I had a chance to hear from two attorneys and a law school student about their respective professional journeys. All three, unsurprisingly, commented that law school was challenging and fulfilling. They also all found that they owed their success to a degree of good fortune during their undergraduate, law school, or job searching years, something that I’m sure we all hope to experience. Surprisingly, though, they all also remarked that their undergraduate years could have done with more of one thing: Fun. Of course, different internships or classes may have…

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Swimming Lessons for Baby Sharks: Practical Advice for New Lawyers

Q: I’m a freshman in High School, and I want to prepare to become an attorney. I have already done a bit of research, but there are still a few questions that I have (below). A: Excellent! You are preparing early! Being a lawyer can be fascinating and rewarding. But it’s not as glamorous as media portrayals. As you progress in your education, learn about legal careers, but keep an open mind about other fields. There is a lot to explore in the world! Here are your questions and my answers:  1.  What job should I get in college if…

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abell

Self-Promotion at Work: If You Got It, Flaunt It

Self-promotion often causes immense yet unnecessary stress and anxiety for many women, including me. (To be honest, even the title of this blog post makes me cringe!). Even though I went to an all-girls high school and a women’s college, where I was empowered and encouraged to make my voice heard, I still struggle with promoting myself professionally. This may have started in college: at Bryn Mawr, my peers were all very intelligent and capable, and we were discouraged from openly discussing grades in order to foster a less competitive environment. Unfortunately, I may have taken this approach with me…

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tatumw

How long do I need to study for the LSAT?

The LSAT is an important factor in law school admissions and their financial aid decisions. Many experts suggest that a minimum pace of 10 hours per week for at least two to three months should help you accumulate the basic skills you’ll need for the LSAT. Any less than this, you can sell yourself short on meeting the admissions targets of the schools that you want to attend. Others advise studying for up to a year. More than anything, you’ll need to maintain a steady, consistent pace along with your other responsibilities as opposed to “binge” studying. In short, there’s…

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KatieDay

Attention Writers- Apply to be a Ms. JD Journalist!

Are you interested in becoming involved with Ms. JD? Do you happen to enjoy writing and maybe even already write for our blog? If your answer to both questions is "YES", then we'd like to invite you to become a Ms. JD Journalist! The Ms. JD Journalists is a group of writers who will be responsible for writing posts, articles, and other content for Ms. JD. Journalists will be asked to commit to a period of either 6 months or 1 year, during which they agree to be “on call” to write about topics which have been identified as topics of…

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susiejean5

Part-Time Law, Full-Time Life: Seeking Balance in a Tilted Profession

Work-life balance. Flex-Time. Part-Time. All three terms are ones regularly heard on the lips of students, faculty, and practicing attorneys. These terms make older generations wince, while younger students and associates seek jobs with descriptions matching one or all three. Many at Ms. JD have discussed these issues: Lori Johnson wrote of her struggle with baby boomers in her office not understanding the importance of choosing family or personal time over billable hours. Ally Kennedy Garcia, Founder of the Association of Mother Immigration Attorneys, posted a worksheet with helpful tips to consider while attempting to build work-life balance into a busy schedule. Many others on…

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JaneeTLegal

Interview with a Virtual Paralegal

With the rise in use of technology in the practice of law, it follows that legal support services, like paralegal and legal assistant services will experience increased technology use as well. But have you ever thought that an entire section of your law practice could be run virtually? Probably not, which is why Ms. J.D. is excited to have had the opportunity to talk with Robin Bull to answer some question about what it means to be a virtual paralegal. Robin Bull is the former Program Director of Paralegal Studies for Vatterott College in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and is the…

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skreed

Skirting the Ceiling: Life Lessons from Women Shortlisted for SCOTUS

To date, there have been 112 justices appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. Four have been women. For every opening on the Supreme Court, there’s been a handful of judges considered for the nomination. Those judges made the “the shortlist.” Over time, twelve women received a spot the shortlist, yet not a seat on the bench. History recognizes each of these women as more than qualified to wear the robes at a time when women were the extreme minority in private practice, law schools, legislature, and courtrooms alike. Yet, presidents passed over each of them for reasons…

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Sappho

Submitting the State Bar Exam Application and Preparing for the Bar

I submitted my bar exam application at the end of March. Since I had completed the July 2016 bar exam application for practice, and obtained my fingerprints then, it was a matter of retyping my application with updated information and gathering my paperwork together. I felt stressed when I completed the application, as evident when I kept reviewing the application for mistakes. I checked the mailing address of my personal references several times and corrected mistakes. I recall when I first completed the bar application it took me several hours over the course of several weeks as I had to…

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