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Janet

New Resources in the Ms. JD Library

Have you checked out Ms. JD's Library? Did you know that Ms. JD's Library is the most comprehensive collection of resources on women in the law? Currently, the Library includes more than 500 resource abstracts for books, articles, reports, and best practice recommendations on topics ranging from work/life balance and retention issues to stereotyping and gender bias in evaluation and compensation systems.Some new additions to the Library include:Some Strategies to Teach Reluctant Talkers to Talk About Law by Sarah E. RicksThe Language of Performance Evaluations: Gender-Based Shifts in Content and Consistency of Judgment by Monica Biernat, M. J. Tocci, and…

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Susan Smith Blakely

Best Friends at the Bar: Young Aspiring Lawyers Meet and Learn about Careers in the Law

This week I am busy working on a presentation for young women college student leaders from across the country.  The National Conference for College Women Student Leaders is  being held this week at the the University of Maryland in College Park.  This conference is a great opportunity for young women to gain information and background on a variety of career options and to have one-on-one discussions with women in those fields and ask important questions about careers of interest to them.It will be my pleasure to speak to these young women.  Most of my speaking events are at law schools,…

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Emily Rock

Montessori 1L: Summer To-Do List

1) Read books for fun I jump-started this item by reading the first book of the Hunger Games trilogy, which had been sitting on my shelf for months, all in one day after I finished my final exam. Friends had assured me, when recommending the novel, that it would be a quick read, but I didn’t want to start anything while I had so much reading to do for class. Reading has always been my main downtime activity, but in law school, the idea of more text in front of my face seems much less fun.  Now, though, I have…

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alisonmonahan

What No One Tells You Before You Go to Law School: You Actually Have to Teach Yourself “The Law”

I have to admit, I was pretty surprised when I showed up to law school and purchased my textbooks. One glance revealed that these were quite different from my undergraduate books. What was up with all of these long cases, followed by a string of questions with no answers? Weren’t these books supposed to teach me “the law”? I definitely wasn’t seeing too many answers! Here’s a little secret: You basically have to teach yourself “the law” in law school! How in the World Can You Teach Yourself? I’ve been thinking a lot about law school pedagogy lately, and reading…

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Susan Smith Blakely

Best Friends at the Bar: The Law School Decision Tailored for Women

 Recently, I was asked the following question by a young woman considering going to law school:What do I need to think about or do before applying to law school to make sure that it is right for me?  This young woman was concerned about the impact of a demanding career on her life, and she wanted some assurance that a law career would be a good fit for her.   My response to her also may be helpful to you.First of all, I was delighted that she was giving all of this such serious thought before diving into law school.  Too…

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Alice Shih

Yale Law Study on Gender from the Professors’ Point of View

This is the third post in a series about Yale Law Women’s study, Yale Law School Faculty & Students Speak Up About Gender: Ten Years Later. The second post examined the results of classroom observation. Student volunteers interviewed 54 professors (out of 83 professors contacted). Fourteen were women professors and forty were men professors. Each professor spoke with a student one-on-one for an hour regarding his or her views on gender dynamics inside and outside of the classroom and beyond law school. The interviews revealed significant differences between women and men faculty. Below are the major findings based on the professor interviews. First, Yale professors…

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Alice Shih

Yale Law Study Insights on Classroom Dynamics

This is the second post in a series about Yale Law Women’s study, Yale Law School Faculty & Students Speak Up About Gender: Ten Years Later. One of three major data collection methods was observing 113 class sessions in 21 Yale Law courses for three one-week periods in September, October, and November 2011. The study recorded the gender of the professor, gender of the speaker, whether it was an initial or subsequent participation, and the origin of the contribution (called on, volunteered, offered a question or comment without professor prompt, interrupted professor or classmate). A total of 2,934 participation events…

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Alice Shih

Yale Law School Faculty & Students Speak Up About Gender: Ten Years Later

In 2002, Yale Law Women (YLW) published Yale Law School Faculty and Students Speak About Gender: A Report on Faculty-Student Relations at Yale Law School. Expanding on several earlier YLS studies of gender dynamics during the 1980s and 1990s, the report noted progress toward gender equality within the law school, identified areas for future improvement, and started a dialogue between faculty and students about these issues. In 2012, YLW launched Yale Law School Faculty & Students Speak Up About Gender: Ten Years Later, a follow-up report on how gender dynamics have changed at Yale Law School over the last decade.…

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alisonmonahan

What No One Tells You Before You Go to Law School: You’re Entering a Sexist Profession

Maybe I was hopelessly naive, but it really never occurred to me that I'd be treated differently in the legal profession because I was a woman. I spent the several years before law school in a heavily male-dominated profession (software), and never had any issues. I'd done a previous graduate degree, same thing. All my life, I'd been "one of the guys" and I'd never had much interest in stereotypically female pursuits such as shopping and talking on the phone. Frankly, I decided at a young age it was a better long-term plan to be smart than to be cute,…

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Emily Rock

Montessori 1L: Stop and Smell the Finger Paint

There are many unique aspects of studying at Yale Law—small classes, no letter grades, students get to pick their own courses after first semester—but even expecting an unconventional legal education, I was surprised at my 1L orientation to hear a professor call Yale “Montessori Law School.” We all laughed, but I’m sure I wasn’t the only one thinking, “Really? What does that mean?”   Montessori education emphasizes independence and freedom of choice, and describes learning as “purposeful activity.” As I reflect on my time so far as a 1L, I’m starting to see what the professor might have meant. This…

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