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Ursula Furi-Perry Esq.

Ms. Prof: Mario, the Bar Exam, and Thoughts on Balance

Halloween is one of my favorite holidays to spend with my kids. This year, Halloween weekend also fell on one of the most important days of the year in my professional life: the release of bar exam results. So, I’ve been balancing: balancing parades and trick-or-treating with the Super Mario brothers with sending congratulatory messages to former students. Both are important to me, and I want to make both work. To do so, I balance.We’ve had no shortage of discussion about work-life balance among women lawyers. For a while, there were also  countless media accounts (likely set off by Lisa…

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jessie

Have Your Been to the Library Lately?

I am talking about Ms. JD's Library.  Two years after Ms. JD launched the Library, the Center for Women in Law at the University of Texas School of Law partnered with Ms. JD to expand the database.Today the Library includes more than 500 resource abstracts for books, articles, reports, and best practice recommendations on topics ranging from work/life balance and retention issues to stereotyping and gender bias in evaluation and compensation systems.  We have categorized these resources by topic. You can search all the resources or search within a topic area. You can limit your search to only one type…

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jessie

Oldie But Goodie: Western Legal History Vol. 7, No. 2

Last weekend I had the pleasure of presenting, alongside Pat Gillette from the No Glass Ceiling Initiative and Linda Chanow from UT's Center for Women in Law, at the National Conference of Women's Bar Associations.  I do not mean to detract at all from the programming - it was a great event and I was flattered to be included - but the highlight might just be the goodie bags.When you go to these conferences you get a tote full of useless items: brochures from sponsors, pens from the hotel, etc.  Well the NCWBA tote bag was in a class by…

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Ursula Furi-Perry Esq.

Ms. Prof: “Diversifying” at Work, but Is It Working? Snippets from the Dialogue Regarding the Recruitment of Women Law Profs

It’s no secret that there are fewer women law profs than male counterparts: according to the American Association of Law School’s 2007-2008 data, women make up 36.9% of law teachers.  For the same year, the ABA reported that female first-years make up 47.4% of the 1L population; in fact, that number has been hovering in the upper-40s since the late 1990s.   Over the past couple of years, various people in the profession have weighed in about the potential problems with the recruitment of women law profs, along with potential reasons why potential problems exist. Snippets from their discussions make for…

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jessie

A Plum Opportunity in a Down Economy: ED’s Post Open at UT’s CWIL

The recently launched Center for Women in Law at the University of Texas School of Law in Austin is looking for a new Executive Director. The Center seems like a pretty amazing place to work. Not only are they the first of their kind, the job is a straight path to academia through a non-traditional route, not to mention an opportunity to work with a group of alumnae founders that's hard to beat. Ms. JD is partnering with the Center on a number of initiatives including their Law School Task Force anda revampedonline library. So I know from personal experience…

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NYC Associates

How to Become a Law Professor—The Move from Big Law to Academia

Professor William B. Rubenstein of Harvard Law School will be conducting a half-day seminar on June 20, 2009 in New York City to help those who are interested in making the transition from private practice to legal academia. Visit http://billrubenstein.com/seminar.html for more details!

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Staci Zaretsky

Harvard Gender and the Law Conference—Registration Required by March 2, 2009

The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University will be hosting a conference entitled Gender and the Law: Unintended Consequences, Unsettled Questions" from Thursday, March 12, 2009, to Friday, March 13, 2009. Registration for the event is required by Monday, March 2, 2009. Click here to register for the conference. Unsettled questions of gender and the law present a broad range of challenges in courtrooms, legislatures, and everyday lives. Laws meant to protect or promote gender equality may have unintended consequences, and laws that seem irrelevant to gender may nonetheless significantly impact gender issues. This conference will convene judges;…

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Anonymous

Dean Search Committee Names Finalists: Four out of Five are Women

Four out five of finalists to serve as the next Dean of the University of Maryland School of Law are women. The finalists include Wendy Collins Perdue, Phoebe A. Haddon, Linda S. Mullenix, Leah Ward Sears, and Mark A. Sargent. After 10 years of service, the Law School's current dean, Karen H. Rothenberg, will step down at the end of the current academic year. Click here for more information on these remarkable finalists. 

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Anonymous

Peggy Cooper Davis: Most Influential Woman in Legal Education

The National Jurist Magazine named Peggy Cooper Davis one of The Most Influential People in Legal Education this month. Dean David Van Zandt and Professor Frederick Schauer joined Professor Davis in receiving the honor. Peggy Cooper Davis is a Professor of Lawyering and Ethics at New York University School of Law. She is also the Director of the widely-acclaimed Lawyering Program at NYU. Working through the Lawyering Program, and through related interdisciplinary seminars and colloquia, Professor Davis strives to revolutionize legal education so that it systematically addresses the interpretive, interactive, ethical and social dimensions of professional practice. Prior to joining…

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Peg

Off Track in Academia

While I can't pretend to be in the know about the gender politics of legal academia, an interesting study was brought to my attention by the FeministLawProfs today. The study, the largest of its kind, found that"[Women academics] are deeply frustrated by a system that they believe undervalues their work and denies them opportunities for a balanced life. While the study found some overt discrimination in the form of harassment or explicitly sexist remarks, many of the concerns involved more subtle “deeply entrenched inequities."Even as somebody who is not involved in academia, I have always been keenly aware of the…

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