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bg3orge

Accommodations for Nursing Mothers

This post is a little late because I am in Scottsdale, Arizona for the Federal Bar Association's 42nd Annual Indian Law Conference. A few things to note about Indian Law conferences: Women bring their children to conferences Nursing accommodations are offered for conference attendees Children are exposed to, and involved in, Indian law and policy ​All of these things are incredibly important, but the one that stands out to me, and that I want to talk about right now is the nursing accommodations offered for mothers. ​Nursing Accommodations The Federal Bar Association sent out detailed emails each day of the conference,…

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bailoun

The Legal Content Curator: How Does Neil Gorsuch Approach Legal Questions?

Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court nominee slated to replace the late Justice Scalia, is no stranger to questions of life and death. His 2009 book, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, looks carefully at the historical trajectory of the current movement in the United States for the right to die, and argues "that all human beings are intrinsically valuable and the intentional taking of human life by private persons is always wrong." Gorsuch, who completed his doctoral degree in philosophy at Oxford, bases his argument on secular moral theory and common law. Much of Gorsuch's way of thinking about…

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nicolemoriniere

Winding Career Paths: Managing Risk and Uncertainty

One of my favorite sayings is that you should be stubborn about goals, but flexible about your methods. I love this idea but I've found that I have to interpret it correctly for it to be helpful.  In terms of career goals, I've interpreted this to mean being stubborn about certain fundamental and underlying aspects of what I want out of my career, such as a career that is purposeful, that matches my interests and skills, and that affords me a certain level of independence and flexibility. I used to focus on specific positions as my goals, which was a mistaken approach…

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Jmnakamoto

You’ll Move Mountains, Kid: Just Be Your Beautifully, Flawed-Self in All That You Do!

When I initially applied for law school, I had a hard time coming up with something to focus on for my personal statement. Of course, there were the typical formats like “why did you want to go to law school” or “why do you think you’d be a great lawyer” that were suggested to all applicants. But I had a better, deeper, and more quality story to share that would answer all of those questions, but without directly answering them. It paid off. In fact, it paid off so well that I was granted a unique scholarship, which was only…

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LovelyLadyLaw7

A Word on the Use of Third Person Pronouns

To use a pronoun or not to use a pronoun.  That is the question.  (Or at least it should be.)  People love their pronouns not only in writing (whether legal or otherwise) but also in conversation.  The problem, however, is that, although pronouns are generally valuable as shortcuts, they are also inherently ambiguous when the reader or the listener can't be certain about the intended antecedent of a pronoun.  For example, I can't count the number of times I've left a conversation feeling confused about the meaning of a pronoun (not to mention the number of times I've had to ask the…

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abell

Self-Promotion at Work: If You Got It, Flaunt It

Self-promotion often causes immense yet unnecessary stress and anxiety for many women, including me. (To be honest, even the title of this blog post makes me cringe!). Even though I went to an all-girls high school and a women’s college, where I was empowered and encouraged to make my voice heard, I still struggle with promoting myself professionally. This may have started in college: at Bryn Mawr, my peers were all very intelligent and capable, and we were discouraged from openly discussing grades in order to foster a less competitive environment. Unfortunately, I may have taken this approach with me…

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susiejean5

Part-Time Law, Full-Time Life: Seeking Balance in a Tilted Profession

Work-life balance. Flex-Time. Part-Time. All three terms are ones regularly heard on the lips of students, faculty, and practicing attorneys. These terms make older generations wince, while younger students and associates seek jobs with descriptions matching one or all three. Many at Ms. JD have discussed these issues: Lori Johnson wrote of her struggle with baby boomers in her office not understanding the importance of choosing family or personal time over billable hours. Ally Kennedy Garcia, Founder of the Association of Mother Immigration Attorneys, posted a worksheet with helpful tips to consider while attempting to build work-life balance into a busy schedule. Many others on…

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alexislamb

HOW I LEFT BIG LAW FOR THE LOCATION-INDEPENDENT NO-PANTS LIFESTYLE, AND HOW YOU CAN TOO

It’s a simple equation: t = m.  Time equals money. It’s an equation taken literally by any lawyer in private practice who divides their day into six-minute increments.  I’m sure more than one of you has debated whether to bill your latest bathroom break to the client. I’m at least thinking about reps and warranties while I’m reapplying deodorant! This is billable time, right?   But t = m has another meaning, one that can pogo to the forefront of an attorney’s mind once they realize that leaving the office at 6AM is a much more frequent occurrence than leaving…

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skreed

Skirting the Ceiling: Life Lessons from Women Shortlisted for SCOTUS

To date, there have been 112 justices appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. Four have been women. For every opening on the Supreme Court, there’s been a handful of judges considered for the nomination. Those judges made the “the shortlist.” Over time, twelve women received a spot the shortlist, yet not a seat on the bench. History recognizes each of these women as more than qualified to wear the robes at a time when women were the extreme minority in private practice, law schools, legislature, and courtrooms alike. Yet, presidents passed over each of them for reasons…

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fhg14CnXLS

Ms. Pre-JD: How Important is ‘Fun’?

At a panel hosted by the Columbia Undergraduate Law Review, I had a chance to hear from two attorneys and a law school student about their respective professional journeys. All three, unsurprisingly, commented that law school was challenging and fulfilling. They also all found that they owed their success to a degree of good fortune during their undergraduate, law school, or job searching years, something that I’m sure we all hope to experience. Surprisingly, though, they all also remarked that their undergraduate years could have done with more of one thing: Fun. Of course, different internships or classes may have…

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