Elizabeth

Blog Article

Shifting Expectations: Women Less Inclined to Pursue Legal Careers

Leigh Jones has an article entitled Fewer Women Are Seeking Law Degrees in the National Law Journal this week. She cites statistics that since 2002 the percentage of women attending law school has declined every year from 49% in 2002 to 46.9% this year. Of course, the total number of applicants to law school has also declined in the past two years with female applicants for 2006 falling by 7.7% and male applicants by 6.7% (Jones has an interesting graph illustrating this phenomenon in her article). At least partly due to the drop in female applicants, the number of women…

read more

Carol Simpson

Blog Article

Avoiding burnout on the Death Row defense bar

Each week during our internship, the legal staff has an “Intern CLE,” or some sort of legal lecture. Sometimes we watch a video on some aspect of public interest law, followed by a Q&A with an attorney practicing in that field. It may be someone working in criminal defense, legal aid, a lobbyist, or a legislative aide. We even watched Good Night, and Good Luck. The interns get to learn a little about other areas of public interest law, and can network with attorneys in other non-profits. And it serves as a little break in an otherwise intensive work week.We…

read more

Tahanie Aboushi

Blog Article

The Expectations Game

As a woman, the most important expectations to fill are my own. I vow to never compare myself to a man and to never make him my standard.As a child my parents always told me there was nothing I could not do. They also told me to never let anyone say or convince me I could not do something. More importantly, I was taught to always look for a challenge and never take the easy way out. Being a woman has become synonymous with challenge. As a woman entering the legal profession I am a reflection of our entire race,…

read more

Victoria Tsoong

Blog Article

Perspective: From a women’s college to a co-ed law class

Coming directly from a women's college to law school, I confronted an unexpected hurtle--a co-ed classroom. In my youth, I attended co-ed schools, but was fortunate to take the opportunity to attend Scripps College of the Claremont Colleges. During college, I was able to gain confidence as a woman and was able to understand what it meant to be a woman in society. I emerged from Scripps confident and independent. Despite the lessons learned from a women's college, I found that, even in this day and age, the legal realm is still adapting to women in executive positions. I had…

read more

Anonymous

Blog Article

My Dream Firm

Daydreams of the perfect firm--from a public interest lawyer who found existing firms too flawed to join.Being a woman entering the legal profession is something that I think about often, although as a young girl growing up, it is a topic I never imagined I would have to consider. Growing up in the 1980s, girls were empowered to try to both outsmart and outrun boys as we played on their sports teams and competed against them in academic competitions. We watched our mothers or our friends' mothers work. We were groomed to go to college before we settled down to…

read more

Meghan Corman

Blog Article

My law school class is 60% female, but we still need a women’s student group.

I am fortunate to attend a law school where women are the majority. At Boalt Hall, approximately 60% of the students are women. Because of these numbers, I escaped many of the law school stereotypes, such as men speaking more often in class, or getting more face time with the professors. Perhaps these things do occur, however it is my perception that such gender stereotypes are not pervasive at Boalt Hall. In fact, some of my male classmates have complained that women are smarter, work harder, and get better grades, thus hurting their chances of performing well when graded on…

read more

Julie Schaffer

Blog Article

Being female is a non-issue

As a woman entering the legal profession, I am hopeful and encouraged. Thus far in my legal education and externship experiences I have been surrounded by capable and confident women. I am encouraged to see that being female, at least in my legal experience, is essentially a non-issue. In applying for jobs, positions on law review, research positions with professors, and other competitive ventures, as well as in signing up for classes, my female colleagues and I have never once discussed our being female. Rather, our conversations focus on our individual qualifications and interests. I simply have not seen women…

read more

Carol Simpson

Blog Article

Generation gap or gender gap? Mother and son enroll in law school together

Being an older woman in entering the legal profession has been an interesting experience. It is difficult to determine if my experiences are more a factor of my gender or my age, but I know that my experiences have been significantly different from those of my son, with whom I am attending the same law school in the same class. Having a background as a professor in another professional school dominated by women, I see considerable differences in how women are treated and welcomed to the profession.The first difference is in how novices are hired and trained. In my previous…

read more

Roya

Blog Article

Do not forget why you came to law school

Since the first day of law school, my law school professors have conveyed words of wisdom. However, one professor in particular gave me advice that continues to provide me guidance when I am overwhelmed with my studies or unsure as to what direction to take. His advice was simple yet profound: Do not forget why you came to law school. The first month I kept thinking how anyone could forget why they came to law school. I came to law school, because I want to have the ability to use the law to help people. I want to be part…

read more

Manamana

Blog Article

Billables: on their way out?

Over at the WSJ Law Blog, they have a post up today entitled "The Billable Hour: Still the Lead Dog, But Gaining Competition" on some changes to the standard billing practice of law firms, namely the alternative practice of using fixed fees for legal services: “Cisco, a leader in the area of so-called alternative billing, now farms out 70% to 75% of its annual legal budget, estimated at $125 million, under fixed-fee arrangements.” This follows a speech on the state of technology in the law by Cisco’s General Counsel, Mark Chandler (mentioned earlier here) in which he highlighted the decrepit…

read more

‹ First  < 48 49 50 51 >