aslenp4

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FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT TO GET QUALITY EDUCATION IN INDIA

The Right to Education has now become the fundamental right under Article 21A Constitution of India, although, United Nations (UN) Conventions and the Principles recognized this right many years ago. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), which was adopted in the year 1948 has also recognized the Right to Education under its own Article 26. Thus, the education does not only make person knowledgeable, but also grooms him to adopt his culture and the values, to be practiced in righteous manner. Right to Education has been recognized under the Article 136 of International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights…

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AzinAbedian

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Alleviating Common Fears Associated During Your First Year of Law School

When you receive your first acceptance letter to law school your heart flutters with excitement.  You cannot wait to share the exciting news with friends, family and loved ones, and you ecstatically wait to turn the chapter onto your new professional and educational path.  As the first day of law school draws near, your heart begins to have that same fluttering feeling, however this time, it feels a little bit different.  This time, the flutter represents nerves, anxiety, and a general sense of uneasiness, as you are unsure of what the first day of school will bring.  Unsettled thoughts begin…

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Whitney.Rutherford

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Beyond the Pencil Skirt: Settling Into Your Thrive

"3L, that's the one where they bore you to tears, right?"  I recently fielded this well-intentioned question from a friendly local coffee shop barista. Rather than respond hastily, I paused and thought on the maxim: 1L: Scare you to death. 2L: Work you to death. 3L: Bore you to death. Is it just me or is the 3L portion of this maxim wrong? 1L year was daunting, primarily because it was new. 2L year did include mountains of work, but only because I— like many of you— chose to be deeply engaged in and out of the classroom. Those two years were a part…

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TristinBrown

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Doubt

When you saw the title of this blog post, a couple of things may have come to mind. Perhaps, you thought about the 2008 film titled ‘Doubt’ that starred Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Or maybe you automatically connected with the doubt that plagued your mind when you reluctantly clicked on the link that led you here and thought to yourself, “Oh gosh, not another blog post.” Whatever the case may be, one thing that is certain is that this one term known as doubt has affected us all in one way or another.  Whether you’re the undergraduate in your…

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jnarang

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Interview with Mariam Zadeh: A Career in Mediation

Mariam Zadeh is currently a mediator at First Mediation Corporation in Los Angeles, CA.  She received her L.L.M. in Alternative Dispute Resolution at Pepperdine University in 2006 and received her J.D. at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in 1995.  She specializes in mediating employment, class action, insurance, and commercial matters.  She has been featured since 2007 as a SuperLawyer in Southern California Super Lawyers magazine and since 2010 in the Best Lawyers in America magazine. How did you end up pursuing mediation as a career? I think everyone gets into it a bit differently.  I was litigating in…

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ArkadyBukh

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5 Must-Dos for a Successful Female Lawyer in New York — and Everywhere Else

There are three examples of female attorneys who have it all: Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Each of these women has reached the pinnacle of the legal profession — a seat on the Supreme Court. The also raised families, educated the world with plenty of judicial opinions and raised children and grandchildren. The all have incredible resumes and have settled in at One First Street, Washington DC. It is challenging — not impossible — to balance a full-time legal career with marriage and children while navigating the maze of being female in a male-dominated profession. The path…

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Bari Burke

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Sisters-in-Law/Then&Now: “THE BONNET OR NOT THE BONNET?”

In 1888, in a letter to her female law colleagues in the Equity Club, Lelia Josephine Robinson said,       “One problem is not yet settled entirely to my satisfaction, and that is: Shall the woman attorney wear her hat when arguing a case or making a motion in court, or shall she remove it?"  Why the interest in bonnets, such a seeming trifle for women who had the fortitude to become lawyers in the late nineteenth century? The bonnet question, however, raised a much more weighty query confronting early women lawyers – “how to be at once a lady and a…

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marlowsvatek

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New Clerk on the Block: If the Presidential Candidates Were Clerkships

So my last post persuaded you, and you’ve decided that you want to clerk. Congratulations! Now let’s get to work. I know that the process can seem daunting. After all, there is a lot of reflection and preparation that goes into the clerkship application process. But I’m here as your guide, and I’m so excited to share in this journey with you! First things first: What kind of clerkship are you interested in? When it comes to clerkships, one size doesn’t fit all. In this post, I’ve enlisted the help of some fabulous clerks to describe their experiences. And, in…

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Mary Wagner

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Law School at Forty

The words are enough to strike terror into the hearts of most attorneys I know. They are the first words you speak when you address the Wisconsin Supreme Court in an oral argument. The words are ritual, standardized and formal. And I was about to say them myself…if I just didn’t faint. I have a framed photo on my desk at work. It dates from perhaps a year before I started law school at the age of forty, and only a few months before I would break my back in a riding accident, spend three painful months in a body cast, and have…

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Mary Wagner

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Law & Disorder

The burly blond with the gold chains nestled in his chest hair sits in the stuffy conference room across the wood table, mulling his options. His wife—short, pert, neatly coiffed and crisply dressed—sits beside him, supportive, argumentative, loyal to a fault. He has been charged with disorderly conduct stemming from a violent evening a month ago when, according to her three-page hand-written statement to police, he scared the hell out of her and roughed her up. It made her—at least temporarily—regret the presence of his many guns in their house. She sits in front of me now to explain it…

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