bailoun

Blog Article

The Legal Content Curator: Four Hints for Improving Your Negotiation Skills

Atticus Finch, the lawyer in the well-loved novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, says to his daughter, "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view . . . until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." Sometimes, as lawyers, that is our job. We are always expected to advocate for our clients, but sometimes we need to do more than that, and put ourselves in the shoes of the other party to understand where they're coming from. If we want to settle cases, or to negotiate an agreement, or to mediate between…

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shantibrien

Blog Article

Implicit Bias: Lessons from a Mock Trial

Two white men and two black men walk into a courtroom….This is not the beginning of a bad joke but rather the start of a true story about implicit bias.  I was honored to be judging in the final tournament of a national mock-trial competition. In the mock-trial the plaintiff and the defendant each had two attorneys: one white attorney and one black attorney. As each spoke, I judged them on pre-set criteria like use of case law, presentation, questions to the witnesses, and handling the judges questions.  At the end, I ranked the attorneys.  Relying on my general impressions…

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Marybeth.Herald

Blog Article

Your Brain, Law School, and Law Practice: The Lure of Truthiness

A decade ago, the comedian Steven Colbert invented the word “truthiness,” a word that means “truth that comes from the gut, not books” and “the quality of preferring concepts or facts one wishes to be true, rather than concepts of facts known to be true.” Truthiness encapsulates how humans often make decisions – motivated by a gut feeling and then backtracking, if pushed, to justify the conclusion.  We often arrive at the answer we want to be true, sometimes at the expense of the answer that is supported by the evidence.   Our brain has developed many tricks to help us…

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Bari Burke

Blog Article

Sisters-in-Law/Then&Now: “THE BONNET OR NOT THE BONNET?”

In 1888, in a letter to her female law colleagues in the Equity Club, Lelia Josephine Robinson said,       “One problem is not yet settled entirely to my satisfaction, and that is: Shall the woman attorney wear her hat when arguing a case or making a motion in court, or shall she remove it?"  Why the interest in bonnets, such a seeming trifle for women who had the fortitude to become lawyers in the late nineteenth century? The bonnet question, however, raised a much more weighty query confronting early women lawyers – “how to be at once a lady and a…

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jsaxena@law.gwu.edu

Blog Article

Who Am I and Why Am I Here? - Uncovering our Covered Selves

We all cover. It’s taken me a long time to share my thoughts on this topic on this very public forum. Yes, between family commitments, travel, and a recent transition in my role at work, I’ve been very busy. But, when I look myself in the mirror, it’s also (and, perhaps, even more so) because this topic is very personal. It’s about our core selves, our identities. And, it made me think about how I cover in my own life and in my workplace. Covering might come in the form of a woman who avoids references to her children at…

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jsaxena@law.gwu.edu

Blog Article

Who Am I and Why Am I Here? – Authentic Confidence

“It’s not who you are that holds you back, it’s who you think you are not.” ~ Denis Waitley With her book, Lean-In, Sheryl Sandberg got folks talking about women and leadership. And, in more recent months, the conversations have moved beyond the initial debate her book prompted.  The conversation continued at last week’s National Association for Law Placement’s[1] (NALP) 2015 Annual Education Conference in Chicago where I attended a fascinating session on women’s leadership and how to develop and champion female professionals.[2] The panelists began the conversation by distinguishing leadership qualities (e.g. inspiring, confident, knowledgeable, positive, motivated etc.) vs.…

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latancs

Blog Article

Create Buzz for Your Business With an Attention-Grabbing Biography

Biographies are increasingly important as part of a digital toolkit and make compelling introductions for book covers and speech presentations.  So why do so many lawyers treat biographies like the literary equivalent of canned soup? To best maximize its effect, understand what a bio is—and isn’t. A Bio is not a Résumé Avoid thinking of a bio as a short-form résumé.  A bio provides context and texture to your work and overall life experience.  Of course, you’ll list your accomplishments—but you’ll highlight your most compelling attributes. A Bio is not a Novel Research indicates that the general attention span of…

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Akunnacook

Blog Article

Law Student Perspective on Serial: Truth in the Criminal Justice System

By now everyone has at least heard of the wildly successful podcast Serial.  I had been avoiding it for weeks because I knew it was the kind of show I would get obsessed with at the expense of my to-do list.  But last weekend I caved to FOMO and sure enough I binge-listened to the fascinating real life murder mystery.  Serial is appealing to anyone who loves a good story.  But for those of us who are interested in the criminal justice system, the back and forth about whether Adnan Syed killed his high school girlfriend Hae Lee justifies the…

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3/18

Event

Diversity & Flexibility Alliance’s 2014 Annual Conference

The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance’s 2014 annual conference, Diversity + Flexibility = Sustainability, is happening on March 18, 2014 at Jones Day in Washington, DC.   The Conference features the most up-to-date action steps for diversity and flexibility, a report on the current state of reduced hour programs, and success strategies for improving retention of top legal talent. The Conference will highlight general counsel, law firm chairs, legal talent professionals, and balanced hours attorneys who will share how they have implemented successful strategies in their organizations for retaining and promoting women and supporting work-life control for all lawyers.  In addition to the knowledge participants…

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Flynn

Blog Article

Yoga & the Law: Ancient Principles, Modern Practice - Ahimsa

I would like to present some thoughts about how ancient yogic principles and philosophies can help all of us—individuals, families, companies, organizations, and communities—to improve our lives. SAMYA Practice was founded on the idea that yoga can lead us to exciting discoveries about ourselves and about each other, allowing us to uncover deep reserves of balance and strength.“Well, that sounds really great,” you might say, “but isn’t it a bit grandiose? How can I use yoga to change my life?  And how can I possibly use yoga to change anyone else’s life? I thought yoga was only good for loosening up my hamstrings.…

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