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7 Avoidable Common Mistakes To Avoid When You Get Arrested

There are some things more terrifying than an arrest. Emotions run high, especially fear & anger. You may also be humiliated and outraged, most especially if you know you’re innocent.

It’s not hard to make mistakes when you’re under these circumstances. These mistakes can cost you your freedom, even though you are innocent.

Appearing to, or resisting arrest.

Fighting with the cops, running and even touching a cop in any way that can give them grounds to charge you with charge of “resisting arrest.” This is crime in its own right, so this may add to your charges, or create a charge that might be difficult to defend where one didn’t exist before.

Once a cop decides to arrest you there’s little you can do to stop the arrest. The idea is to get through it as fast and as easily as you can.

Using Insulting Words on the cops.

While you can not get any additional charges for using insulting words on the cops, it can make them to make your life more difficult than it supposed to be. They can delay each step of the process and find perfectly legal means to make your incarceration even more difficult.

Insults and threats won’t stop the cops from getting you arrested. Additionally, if the cops get tapes of you yelling abusive words at the police it could be used against you in a court of law, making you look less sympathetic and guiltier than ever. See what cops hate about people read more…

Protesting your innocence.

Once the police have decided to arrest you they have decided you are guilty. Fortunately they can only get you arrested. Innocence and guilt is determined in the law court.

The more you argue with the cops the more you’ll anger them. You also might let some details slip which could be used against you later. It’s just not worth it at all.

Answering questions in the interrogation room.

The cops can lie to you legally to try to trick you into incriminating yourself. One little innocuous fact you let slip, like, “I bought potato chips at the convenience store on 24th Street,” could place you closer to crime scene.

Give your correct name and your address. Then say this, “I’m invoking my rights to silence and to counsel.” Then, keep your mouth shut.

There’s not a single thing you can say that will make cops let you go. There is plenty you can say and they might never will. You may even end up making a false confession.

Signing any document.

You don’t have to sign anything, and you shouldn’t. You might be signing a waiver of rights, or a confession someone else might have written out for you, or anything else that could cause serious troubles down the line.

Just say, “I will not sign anything until my lawyer has had a chance to review all documentation,” and leave it at that.Lying to the cops.

Lying to the cops is a criminal offense. Even a small lie could create criminal charges or resisting arrest where none really existed. The cops might not have had much of a case for whatever they are arresting you for, after all.

Stick to your right to remain silent, your right to counsel, and your intention to invoke both rights.

Failing to find a private lawyer.

Lawyers are very passionate, good people. They are also so busy they don’t have to necessarily come down to the jail to talk you through each aspect of the process. You might not even meet your public lawyer until a few minutes before your first hearing.

A private lawyer can come down to your jail, spend a great deal of time listening to what you’ve got to say about your case, and walk you through every process. Your private lawyer may be able to talk you out of cops custody or any charges that might stick.

A good private criminal lawyer will work with you on the money. You don’t have to worry about that. You’ll lose far more money if you end up staying in jail longer than you’re supposed to. Get someone who has your back like NYC Assault Lawyer. You’ll be glad you did.

7 Fatal Mistakes To Avoid When You Get Arrested

There are some things more terrifying than an arrest. Emotions run high, especially fear & anger. You may also be humiliated and outraged, most especially if you know you’re innocent.

It’s not hard to make mistakes when you’re under these circumstances. These mistakes can cost you your freedom, even though you are innocent.

Appearing to, or resisting arrest.

Fighting with the cops, running and even touching a cop in any way that can give them grounds to charge you with charge of “resisting arrest.” This is crime in its own right, so this may add to your charges, or create a charge that might be difficult to defend where one didn’t exist before.

Once a cop decides to arrest you there’s little you can do to stop the arrest. The idea is to get through it as fast and as easily as you can.

Using Insulting Words on the cops.

While you can not get any additional charges for using insulting words on the cops, it can make them to make your life more difficult than it supposed to be. They can delay each step of the process and find perfectly legal means to make your incarceration even more difficult.

Insults and threats won’t stop the cops from getting you arrested. Additionally, if the cops get tapes of you yelling abusive words at the police it could be used against you in a court of law, making you look less sympathetic and guiltier than ever. See what cops hate about people read more…

Protesting your innocence.

Once the police have decided to arrest you they have decided you are guilty. Fortunately they can only get you arrested. Innocence and guilt is determined in the law court.

The more you argue with the cops the more you’ll anger them. You also might let some details slip which could be used against you later. It’s just not worth it at all.

Answering questions in the interrogation room.

The cops can lie to you legally to try to trick you into incriminating yourself. One little innocuous fact you let slip, like, “I bought potato chips at the convenience store on 24th Street,” could place you closer to crime scene.

Give your correct name and your address. Then say this, “I’m invoking my rights to silence and to counsel.” Then, keep your mouth shut.

There’s not a single thing you can say that will make cops let you go. There is plenty you can say and they might never will. You may even end up making a false confession.

Signing any document.

You don’t have to sign anything, and you shouldn’t. You might be signing a waiver of rights, or a confession someone else might have written out for you, or anything else that could cause serious troubles down the line.

Just say, “I will not sign anything until my lawyer has had a chance to review all documentation,” and leave it at that.

Lying to the cops.

Lying to the cops is a criminal offense. Even a small lie could create criminal charges or resisting arrest where none really existed. The cops might not have had much of a case for whatever they are arresting you for, after all.

Stick to your right to remain silent, your right to counsel, and your intention to invoke both rights.

Failing to find a private lawyer.

Lawyers are very passionate, good people. They are also so busy they don’t have to necessarily come down to the jail to talk you through each aspect of the process. You might not even meet your public lawyer until a few minutes before your first hearing.

A private lawyer can come down to your jail, spend a great deal of time listening to what you’ve got to say about your case, and walk you through every process. Your private lawyer may be able to talk you out of cops custody or any charges that might stick.

A good private criminal lawyer will work with you on the money. You don’t have to worry about that. You’ll lose far more money if you end up staying in jail longer than you’re supposed to. Get someone who has your back like NYC Assault Lawyer. You’ll be glad you did.

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