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claireeparsons

Now Accepting Applications: 2020 Writers in Residence Program

Ms. JD is currently seeking applications for our 2020 Writers in Residence Program. The Writers in Residence program was started in 2010 and is a select group of practicing attorneys, alternative career individuals, pre-law students, current law students, and other professionals who contribute monthly articles for one year to the Ms. JD blog on a topic of their choosing. Some blog titles this year were: "The Mental Load: Learning to Say No", "Five Tips to Maximize Your Efficiency When In-House", "Why Can’t Law Firms Retain Their Female and Minority Lawyers? Because Conformity is Exhausting", "Purpose Over Paycheck" and many many…

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KatieDay

Join Ms. JD as our Social Media Coordinator!

Do you have crazy social media skills? Is your smart phone always ready to Tweet, Pin, and Post? Do you have a passion for women helping women? If you answered yes to these questions, you might be just the person we are looking for!  Ms. JD is seeking a part-time Social Media Coordinator to join us as an independent contractor to help build and manage our social media outreach strategies. As an independent contractor, the Social Media Coordinator will exercise her or his own independent judgment and discretion to support Ms. JD’s online presence. What will you be doing? As…

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editor

Meet Ms. JD’s 2019 Fellows

Ms. JD is proud to announce this year’s outstanding class of 2019 Fellows! This year’s fellows are from schools from coast to coast and present a broad spectrum of experience and legal interests.  The 2019 Ms. JD Fellowship Winners are: Maia Bartee, University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law Aubre Dean, Syracuse University College of Law Idia Egonmwan, Howard University School of Law Cristina Gil, American University Washington College of Law Alana Glover, University of Baltimore School of Law Candace Goldman, Southern University Law Center  Nina Neff, University of Wisconsin Law School  Rima Sawhney, California Western School of Law …

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Pmjesquire

What is the #1 Piece of Career Advice You Have Received?

After almost twenty years of practicing law at larger firms, I have been craving the freedom of setting my own schedule and the ability to work from home for a very long time.  My hesitation to go out on my own was rooted in the uncertain financial nature of self-employment. After several meetings with colleagues, I felt strongly guided that it was finally time to start my own practice. One colleague and I discussed working together on a contract basis. This arrangement meant that I would remain self-employed, but that she could give me a minimum amount of work each…

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Stratus Admissions

Three Key Elements for a Powerful Personal Statement

Editor's Note: All opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors.  When a law school admissions officer reads your personal statement, what three words do you want to come to mind? Ideally, the classic triumvirate: passionate, tenacious and successful. There are multiple reasons why this traditional combination works and why it is so important to clearly establish these traits in your application to law school.​ Identify Your Passion. Everyone has something she is passionate about. If you are unsure of where or how to start your personal statement, this is a natural place. Whether your passion is in a…

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Susan Smith Blakely

What All Lawyers Need to Know about Origination Credit

If you are a lawyer just beginning your career, you probably don't spend a lot of time worrying about origination credit.  In fact, maybe you never heard of the concept.  That makes sense.  You have a lot of other things to worry about that affect you on a daily basis in pursuit of improving your skills and becoming the best lawyer you can be. But there is a difference between "worrying about" and "being informed about."  As far as I am concerned, every private practice lawyer, regardless of experience, needs to at least be familiar with the concept of origination…

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XpYmu98NtP

The Mental Load: Learning to Say “No”

Learning to say “no” is touted as an essential component of reducing stress, overwhelm, and burnout. If you’d like to do a little brushing up on this concept, here’s a fantastic refresher from my friend Nikki who writes an amazing blog aimed at empowering women. Following her tips in your daily life will help you hone your “No” skills. But in the professional context, things can get complex. Apart from examining your true desires, following your intuition, and being honest with yourself and others, you’re flooded with extra factors and influences that can make a “no” especially hard to dole…

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SCarr

Navigating Interstate and International Marijuana Sales

My home state of Kentucky, proud to be known as the birthplace of bourbon, crafts 95 percent of the world’s supply of America's only native spirit. Kentucky products dominate the market because they’re formulated with the perfect mix of climate, conditions, and the pure limestone water necessary for creating a high-quality bourbon. Interstate and international exports of bourbon are multimillion-dollar industries that are surging in our state. With  the evolution of marijuana legalization, attorneys looking to grow a cannabis practice could create opportunities for clients to similarly capitalize on interstate and international marijuana sales. Like Kentucky and bourbon, certain states…

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SCarr

How High: Calculating Marijuana Taxes

Notorious Prohibition-era gangster Al Capone reportedly bragged, “They can’t collect legal taxes from illegal money.” Capone learned the hard way that this isn’t true when he was sentenced to prison for tax evasion. Relatedly, marijuana remains illegal at the federal level but revenue from marijuana sales are taxable. Cannabis businesses that fail to understand and plan for these taxes are at high risk for an IRS audit, a massive tax bill, or even tax evasion charges for failure to report. Tax attorneys interested in cannabis law are needed to help these entities understand, plan and prepare for taxation. The following…

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Susan Smith Blakely

The Future of Billable Hours—- What All Young Lawyers Love to Hate

Billable hours.  Ugh.  The end all and be all in most law firms today.  Together with client origination, billable hours have been the measure of success for law professionals for generations. 2200 annually.  2000.  1950.  It really doesn't matter.  The ounce of flesh that is exacted to reach those numbers is considerable and should be of primary concern. Wellness of professionals, wholesome law firm values, training young lawyers to become law firm leaders, and client service should matter most --- not billable hours. Despite these countervailing considerations, we keep concentrating on leveraging and law firm profits, all of which derive…

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