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Anonymous

Justice Ginsburg Visits New England Law Boston, Recounts Career Roadblocks

Justice Ginsburg helped New England Law Boston celebrate its 100th year by speaking to a group of 180 law students last week. Ginsburg recelled some of the challenges she faced as a woman in the profession, reported The Boston Globe: Ginsburg said rising through the ranks in a legal profession that was almost the exclusive domain of men was challenging. She said that after she graduated from Columbia Law School in 1959, where she was at the top of her class, "there was not a single law firm in the city of New York that would give me a job."…

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Ms. JD

First Women Series: Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw

Ed. Note: The following post is a First Women series submission by Judge Kim Wardlaw. Judge Kim Wardlaw Biography: President William Jefferson Clinton nominated Judge Wardlaw to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on January 27, 1998. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on July 31, 1998, and appointed to the Court on August 3, 1998. Judge Wardlaw had previously served on the United States District Court for the Central District of California since January 3, 1996. Before joining the district court, she was a litigation partner of the international law firm O’Melveny & Myers, and was based…

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Staci Zaretsky

Breaking the Glass Ceiling Abroad: Two Appointed as Palestine’s First Female Judges

Khuload Faqih and Asmahan Wuheidi made history this month when they were appointed as the first female Islamic judges in Palentine, according to an article released by the AP. Judge Faqih believes that she has "opened a door for [herself] and other women." The female judges say they can help their sisters obtain their rights under Islamic law. The decision affects only the West Bank, ruled by the Western-backed Palestinian Authority. In the Gaza Strip, the ruling militant group Hamas has not made similar appointments, although Hamas women have become legislators and are slowly emerging in senior positions. In her…

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Janet

Dawn Johnson, Assistant Attorney General

In addition to his nomination of Elena Kagan for the position of Solicitor General, Barack Obama recently tapped Dawn Johnsen to be an assistant attorney general in his administration. Johnsen is currently a Professor of Law and Ira C. Batman Faculty Fellow at the Indiana University School of Law—Bloomington. She spent several years as an attorney in the Office of Legal Counsel of the U.S. Department of Justice, serving as its Acting Assistant Attorney General in 1997 and 1998. A Constitutional Law scholar, Johnsen has published extensively on Constitutional powers and authority. Her recent law review articles include Faithfully Executing…

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Janet

Elena Kagan, Solicitor General

President-elect Obama announced key Department of Justice posts today, including the nomination of Elena Kagan for Solictitor General. Currently the 11th Dean of Harvard Law School (and the first woman in that post), Kagan served in Bill Clinton's White House from 1995 to 1999. During the Clinton Adminstration she served first as Associate Counsel to the President and then as Deputy Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy and Deputy Director of the Domestic Policy Council. In addition to her current deanship at Obama's Alma Mater, Kagan and Obama taught at the University of Chicago Law School at the same…

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Janet

Justice Judith Kaye in the New Yorker: Special Kaye

Jeffrey Toobin penned a piece for the New Yorker this month on Justice Judith Kaye. The "Talk of the Town" profile, Special Kaye, reflects on a variety of Kaye's accomplishments, from the renovations of Foley Square courthouse that she championed to her promotion of jury service. The jury room, with its dozing strangers awaiting the call to dispense justice, never fails to stir her soul. (Kaye always says “jury service,” not “jury duty.”) No detail is too small for her attention. The coffee stand, to her regret, can’t muster the technology for cappuccino; the in-house magazine for jurors has a…

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Janet

Celebrating the Career of Chief Judge Judith Kaye

The New York Law Journal is celebrating Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye's career in a variety of posts over the next several weeks: Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye has written hundreds of opinions hewing closely to the state's legal traditions at the same time they seek to anticipate changes in society. As the chief executive officer of all the state's courts, she has promoted myriad reforms to make justice more efficient and more accessible. At the end of this month, her 25 years on the state's highest Court - a record 15 as chief judge - will end. Beginning today,…

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Anonymous

Janet Napolitano: Obama’s Choice for Secretary of Homeland Security

Gov. Janet Napolitano of Arizona is President-elect Barack Obama’s choice for homeland security secretary. Napolitano received her Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia School of Law. After law school she clerked for Judge Mary M. Schroeder of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and then joined Schroeder's former law firm, Lewis and Roca, where she became partner in 1989. Napolitano, a native of New York, rose to national prominence in 1991 when she was an attorney to Anita Hill, whose allegations of sexual harassment nearly derailed the Senate confirmation of Supreme Court judge Clarence Thomas.…

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Anonymous

Hillary Clinton: The Trailblazer

Dubbing her a "trailblazing political pioneer," Hillary Clinton was named a 2008 Woman of the Year by Glamour Magazine. Although she did not reach the White House, Kati Marton writes that Hillary "won while losing." She continues to be a huge force on every topic she cares about, and her stature remains undiminished throughout the world. “Hillary has emerged as an international symbol of the endeavor to give globalization a more human face,” says Michelle Bachelet, the president of Chile. Hillary’s famous “18 million cracks” in the glass ceiling—the number of votes cast for her in the primaries—represent the closest…

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Joan Lukey

First Women: Joan Lukey

Editor's Note: This December, Ms. JD is celebrating the gift of women's leadership with new content about great women leaders and reposting some of our favorites.  To learn more about how you can get involved, click here.  This post was originally published in 2008 when Joan Lukey was elected as the first woman President-Elect of the American College of Trial Lawyers. At that time, she gave thanks to one woman who made her ascent possible. At some point in virtually every working day, a thought passes through my mind -- sometimes grabbing hold and refusing to depart quickly -- about the women who have…

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