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JLSkocik

Pipe Dreams and Pumps: One Public Interest Law Student’s Two-Sided Story

When I decided to go to law school, I knew I wanted to help people. I wanted to be what they call a “public interest student.” For me, law school was a magic place where I could acquire a particularized skill set in order to help more people more effectively. It never occurred to me (a first-generation law student from Missouri) that people attended law school to do anything else. I capitalized on my experience studying and teaching abroad and working with juvenile sex offenders to create the most compelling personal statement I could dream up, and I was off…

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jenreise@gmail.com

Choosing a law school: Four factors that matter, besides the U.S. News rankings

With the 2020 U.S. News rankings of law schools finally out, there’s a lot of discussion about the winners and losers this year. But as an individual applying to law school, rankings don’t tell the whole story.  Here are four factors to consider in order to identify what the best law school is – not in general, but specifically for you. Location You’ll make important connections in law school, and most will be in the surrounding legal market. You’ll clerk at a local firm, network with local attorneys, and learn about the business and legal landscape of that community. In…

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KatieDay

Webinar: Speak Up: Finding Your Voice and Taking Charge of Your Career

On March 6, 2019, Ms. JD Board Member Katie Day sat down with Jodi Flynn, Executive Coach and Founder of Women Taking the Lead for a webinar on speaking up. In this webinar, Jodi shares three stumbling blocks to speaking up and provides practical solutions. Want to learn more about speaking up? Join Ms. JD on March 14-15 at the University of Pennsylvania School of Law for "Speak Up" our 11th Annual Conference on Women in the Law. Have questions about the stumbling blocks Jodi discusses? Want to pick her brain? Shoot her an email at jodi@womentakingthelead.com.  About Jodi Jodi Flynn of…

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jenreise@gmail.com

What’s a “good” LSAT score?

January 2019 LSAT scores are coming out Friday. What does your number mean for your future prospects? I remember studying hard for the LSAT and waited in fear to hear how I did – but when I finally heard, I still wasn’t sure what that meant for my law school prospects.  Here’s what I wish I had known: A perfect score on the LSAT is 180, and the lowest is 120. The average score of LSAT test takers is right around 150. But the LSAT score you need to get into law schools is generally above that average – and…

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dlamorie

LinkedIn Success in 3 Easy Steps: Job Hunters Edition

Happy New Year dear readers!  I am happy to report that I am back on the blog.  In fact, after such a rewarding experience blogging as a 2018 Writer in Residence for Ms. JD, I have accepted a position on its Board of Directors.  I am really excited about getting more deeply involved and helping Ms. JD bring exciting programs and opportunities for young women everywhere. My latest blogging inspiration manifested itself during a recent alumni women's circle I joined.  I heard from several women recognizing the value of having a LinkedIn presence, but saying they were intimidated by how…

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kmiceli

Unpaid Internships: A Garbage and Discriminatory Legal Practice

Do you want to know the best-kept secret in the legal community? Unpaid internships. In my last blog post, I mentioned that I had four unpaid internships in law school. I received several stunned responses from friends outside the legal community, specifically those in business school. I thought it was common knowledge that many law student internships are unpaid. Spoiler alert: it’s not. For those outside the legal community, here are two important things you should know. One, it is very common for law students to work full-time, unpaid internships during the summer and school year. Two, law students are…

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robertaoroberts

Dear Future Lawyer: Advice for Minority Women Law Students From Author Neena R. Speer, Esq.

In 2018, the American Bar Association reported that less than 40% of lawyers in the United States are women, and that less than 20% of lawyers in the United States are people of color. As the statistics make clear, women of color are overwhelmingly outnumbered in the legal profession.  Having experienced this isolation herself, lawyer, author, speaker, and nonprofit founder Neena R. Speer, Esq. seeks to help provide solace for this underrepresented population by sharing her experience with other women of color on their journeys to becoming lawyers. As a minority woman lawyer myself, I am happy to share this…

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KatMacfarlane

Testing Accommodations are not a Gift of Extra Time

Late last year, a University of Michigan Law student sent an email about testing accommodations to a public listserv. The subject: “People using ‘extra’ time.” In the email’s body, the student wrote: “I see you messing up the curve for me thanks.” Michigan Law’s Assistant Dean for Student Life issued a compassionate response affirming the law school’s commitment to diversity and its disabled students. Above the Law condemned the student’s complaints in a late-December column. Still, the idea that testing accommodations are a gift which might unfairly ruin another student’s grades persists. I want to debunk this myth. Accommodations are…

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dennis.w.hung@gmail.com

Making A Choice: Is Law School Right for You?

Going to law school is a popular decision among those looking for a prestigious career path. Motivated by what they've seen on television and the movies, many go to law school only to quickly find out that the reality of practicing law is much different than what they've seen in fiction. If you are considering law school, you'll want to ask yourself the questions below before you send in your application. Do You Want to Go to Law School? The most important question to ask yourself is if you really want to go to law school. Don't go because you…

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hend2292

When the Going Got Tough: Remembering Your Why.

During my law school orientation, my classmates and I were given a blank sheet of paper with an envelope. We were instructed to write down a reminder to ourselves. Please transcribe why you decided to come to law school. All of your dreams, hopes, and aspirations on a piece of paper safely tucked away in an envelope. To be unsealed only in the case of a dire emergency.  For me, the emergency came one week after my first class commenced. I needed to remind myself why I, a single mom with a rambunctious little boy and a never ending to-do…

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