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lawyergirl

We are the phanthoms . we are not supposed to be here

  We are the phanthoms.we are not supposed to be here by Dr ilise L Feitshans JD and ScM and DIR  In the middle of the spring semester of second year law school when students have often successfully adjusted to the rigors of a difficult almost military austerity and discipline regime one professor chose to rattle the box of security his students had constructed so very carefully I don't know why I am here teaching constitutional law professor Roy Schotland proclaimed in his squeaky unsettling voice. None of you are going to argue before the Supreme Court The year was…

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biglawinvestor

How to Get A Handle on Student Loans

It's that time of the year again. Fall is in the air and thousands of newly-minted lawyers across the country are walking into their first jobs after having passed the bar exam (we hope!). While the flush of starting a career is a lot of fun, there's usually a monster hiding in the background that many lawyers would prefer to avoid: staggering student loan debt.  Luckily, paying off your student loans is a problem that you're well-equipped to handle, assuming you decide to take a proactive approach rather than burying your head in the sand. Get your arms around your…

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cZJLDe3t7y

Ethics and the Burden of a Criminal Lawyer

Defense lawyers have a difficult job. While these lawyers work in the confines of the law, and they work similar hours to other lawyers, they carry an ethical burden that a lot of other lawyers do not. A criminal lawyer may defend a murderer or rapist. They can be ethical, or they can be unethical attorneys. You can work helping inmates on death row clear their names, and this can be a tremendously rewarding experience. But a criminal lawyer may need to live with the fact that a guilty man is going free. There's also the issue of an innocent…

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mjtimko13

Something Blue: Bringing Blue-Collar Roots to the Legal Profession - Finding Purpose and Giving Back

As I continue to move forward in my career and slowly chip away at my student debt, I feel more compelled to pay it forward.  I often wonder whether us “Straddlers” and first generation lawyers have a greater propensity to engage in volunteer work, perhaps as a way to reconcile the duality of gratitude (for how far we have come) and guilt (for what we may have left behind).    I attended a pro bono training several years ago, sponsored by an area bar association.  At the time, I had been feeling a little uninspired by the daily grind of my work in healthcare…

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slrahders

Announcing the Winners of the Ms. JD Summer 2019 Public Interest Scholarship Competition

Ms. JD is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Public Interest Scholarship Competition! The four scholarship recipients were selected from a large pool of highly competitive applicants. Ms. JD appreciates the level of passion and personal conviction that was exhibited in the application pool, and we are thrilled to support these students in their pursuit of public interest careers.   Royse G. Bachtel is a rising 2L at Duquesne University School of Law in Pittsburgh, PA.  This summer Royse will be working as a summer legal intern at the Women’s Law Project, a public interest legal center that…

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vcstephens

Summer Associate Advice Good for a Lifetime: Solicit, Receive, and Materialize Constructive Feedback

Many leaders succeed in their fields because they request continuous feedback, process it, and adjust their course. As a law students, I attended panel discussions centered on soliciting feedback very frequently, so it seems like a hot-button topic for young associates. The legal field is incredibly challenging; the learning curve is steep and the workplace dynamics are intricate. I want to make continuous and open dialogue about my learning opportunities a regular part of my legal process,  so I talked to my mentors about how to request and receive actionable constructive feedback. Here are a few tips that I picked…

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kmiceli

The Happy Lawyer: A Year-Long Experiment

My last year of law school, I took a seminar class called “The Happy Lawyer”. The concept was simple; ten law students, one dean, and one professor read six books about happiness and discuss them over dinner throughout the school year. Full disclosure, I took this class because it was at the dean’s house (who doesn’t want to see their law school dean’s house?) and was taught by one of my favorite professors. The happiness and mindfulness aspect of the class was secondary at best.    Over the course of the year, we read six books including; Happiness: A Very…

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slrahders

Ms. JD Summer 2019 Public Interest Scholarship Competition is Now Open!

Ms. JD is pleased to announce that applications are now open for the 2019 Summer Public Interest Scholarship Competition!  The recipients of the 2019 Public Interest Scholarship Competition will each receive a scholarship, up to $5,000 per recipient, to go towards their summer living expenses as they pursue careers in public interest law. Ms. JD is thrilled to continue our support of women pursuing public interest careers and soften the burden faced by folks who accept public interest internships, which are often unpaid.   Eligibility The Scholarship is open to all law students who currently identify as women, or who have previously…

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SCarr

Know Before You Grow: Marijuana versus Hemp

Growing a cannabis law practice requires a working knowledge of the legal and botanical differences between marijuana and hemp so practitioners can interpret current laws and anticipate future laws. The following is a simplified, step-by-step guide to understanding their relationship and key differences. This information will be the primer for future posts about legal opportunities in the cannabis field. Step One: All in the Family If you’re a bourbon aficionado or have the pleasure of calling yourself a Kentuckian, you know that all bourbon is whiskey but not all whiskey is bourbon. The same logic applies here: both marijuana and…

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JLSkocik

Pipe Dreams and Pumps: One Public Interest Law Student’s Two-Sided Story

When I decided to go to law school, I knew I wanted to help people. I wanted to be what they call a “public interest student.” For me, law school was a magic place where I could acquire a particularized skill set in order to help more people more effectively. It never occurred to me (a first-generation law student from Missouri) that people attended law school to do anything else. I capitalized on my experience studying and teaching abroad and working with juvenile sex offenders to create the most compelling personal statement I could dream up, and I was off…

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