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Anna

Dressing for success as a young (read: still in debt), pregnant lawyer

http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/best_for_the_business/

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Manamana

Gen Y and the Blame Game

The New York Times’ Lisa Belkin—she who graced us with the oversimplifying phrase “opt-out”—is a good writer, and she frequently touches on subjects that I find personally compelling. This is largely because she’s one of the few mainstream media writers writing about the working life struggles that I face or will face, and which I spend a lot of time thinking about. (Why she has been cosigned to the Styles Section, rather than, say, the Business Section, and what message that sends about the valuation of issues relating to working women and men vis-à-vis their personal lives, is worth a…

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SDevlin

Ms. Stiletto, Meet Ms. Rubber-heel

I understand the stereotypical female shoe fetish. I understand the draw to higher arches, slimmer heels, pointier toes, shinier patent leather. In a profession where office dress is often highly regulated, a woman's shoe is where she expresses both her power and her femininity. When, Ms. Stiletto, a powerful female professional, marches into a room in a 5 inch black pointy-toed stiletto, you can almost hear the click of the heels say "I am woman, hear me roar." Ms. Stiletto, I highly admire you and your shoes, but I am not one of you. I've tried, but my feet hurt…

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sintecho

Is there an issue with calling yourself an “esquire”?

Are you, like me a few days ago, unaware of the debate raging on the proper use of the title Esquire? Among the issues: can you call yourself Esquire? can you use the title outside of a legal context? can the title even apply to women? My journey into these (mostly boring questions) started when I found this conversation on Google answers about potential issues with women lawyers putting "Esquire" after their names, with the question being whether there was something inherently male about the term. The Illinois Bar Association has a Q&A by Gertrude Block explaining that Esquire was…

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lsdrake

Irresponsibility, according to Obama

My dad sent me a text message tonight. And here's the conversation:Dad: did you just hear Obama call you irresponsible?Me: Eh?Dad: For not getting your child health careDad: DebateDad: CnnMe: ah! no cnn, glad to hear I'm irresponsibleDad: he is just too high and almighty for me This is an especially interesting comment coming from my dad, because I have rarely heard my dad speak of his political views. We have political debates at the house among my many siblings, however he typically doesn't join in. He votes, but doesn't say who he votes for.Here's my story on my daughter's lack…

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Anna

How to Avoid Crying at Work [Part 1 of 3]

Last week I linked to a lively discussion of crying in public. In a comment, CM asked how to prevent crying at inappropriate moments. Sintecho asked me the same thing a couple weeks back. So I've rounded up a bunch of bona fide face-savers plus a myth to debunk. From research and my all-too-personal experience, here are twelve ways to avoid tears at work. · Focus on your breathing· Take a step back· Cauterize your tear ducts· Distract yourself with pain· Use props · Let yourself get angry· Try behavioral modification· Do it for somebody else· Forge ahead· Just ignore…

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Anna

Wonder what damage your high heels are doing?

Thanks to Lisa at Sociological Images: Seeing Is Believing, you can see all the damage your work shoes are doing to your feet--in gory, glorious detail. [Hat tip to LawGeek.] Here's a direct link to the full-size image, so you don't have to go blind squinting at your screen. Those stilettos are going to give you enough health problems to deal with already.P.S. Here's a hint for healing that heel-related pain!

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Anna

Five Tips for Commuting While Pregnant (and Afterward)

If you missed it, on Friday the Wall Street Journal Juggle blog asked readers to comment on commuting while pregnant. What resulted was a long, long thread of horror stories (from pregnant women forced to stand for long subway rides while fellow passengers feigned sleep) punctuated with a few friendlier tales and lot of people admonishing each other to be more courteous. If you are looking for commiseration, head to the Juggle blog. If you are looking for solutions, just scroll down! I read through the thread to glean tips for Ms. JD readers. Five tips for commuting while pregnant…

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Anna

How to Avoid Crying at Work [Part 3 of 3]

In previous posts (Part 1 and Part 2), I outlined eight ways to avoid crying at work. The techniques were mainly preventive, although some of them could also be used to hurry past tears after you've started crying. (In such situations, for instance, it might still help to take a step back or focus on your breathing.) My last four tips are different. They won't help you completely avoid crying. These are last resorts for handling tears that come out despite your best efforts. · Forge ahead· Just ignore it· Deflect with a white lie· Be honest and direct Different…

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Anna

How to Avoid Crying at Work [Part 2 of 3]

Previously I described four ways to avoid crying at work: focusing on your breathing, taking a step back, cauterizing your tear ducts, and distracting yourself with pain. Here are four more tricks for preventing tears...· Use props · Let yourself get angry· Try behavioral modification· Do it for somebody else An explanation of when, how, and why each technique works follows after the jump... 5. Use props.Prepare an agenda for your meeting, a physical piece of paper that you can set on the desk in front of you or hold in your hands. If that doesn't fit the situation, you…

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