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Anonymous

Equal Justice Works on Student Debt

Ed. Note: The following post will be of interest to Ms. JD readers entering law school, attending law school, or those readers already working. Whether a student, an attorney at a private firm, or an attorney working for government or a public interest organization, the following links provide information to those readers about planning for student loan debt and the pay-back process. Several recent posts on Equal Justice Works discussing student loan debt caught my eye: Equal Justice Works and American University’s Washington College of Law have teamed up to launch an all-new podcast: The Student Debt Relief Series. The…

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Ms. JD

Will BigLaw Embrace Grade-Less, High-Pedigree JDs?

Ed. note: The following article comes to Ms. JD courtesy of author Michael Estrin and bitterlawyer.com. They interviewed a number of hiring partners at major U.S. law firms, who expressed concern about decisions by Harvard and Stanford law schools to switch to a pass/fail system. This article might be of interest to many Ms. JD readers, especially given past issues and discussions concerning the compatibility between current law school learning frameworks and female law students. Class rank is everything. It separates the future scholars from the posers; the potential Big Firm Partners from the 9-to-5 government slackers. If there were…

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AndreaKWelker

Ask a Mom in Law School: The Possibility of Pregnancy

Cross-posted at (Formerly) Knocked Up (and in Law School): A new reader asks: I just found your blog after googling "taking the bar exam while pregnant." I'm not in law school, but I am in the dead middle of a PhD. What is your take on the possibility of being pregnant during a major exam (in my case my "orals"). Terrible idea? Disaster? Not as bad as it sounds? Just reading these comments on your blog makes me feel better about the prospect of pregnancy - so nice to see a bunch of women thinking about families and careers happening…

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scherae

Adventures in DC

I apologize for starting this blog so late into the summer (how does time go by so fast?!), but I still wanted to share some of my thoughts with you. This summer, I have had the pleasure of doing an internship at the National Disability Rights Network in Washington, DC. NDRN is a national, non-profit organization that oversees and provides legally-based advocacy services to people with a wide variety of disabilities on topics ranging from healthcare to employment to education, among may others. It has been an incredibly wonderful journey thus far, particularly since there has been several new developments…

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mnienaber-foster

My Mommy Still Wants to Be a Lawyer

A little more than a year has passed since I posted my first story with Ms. JD. (see post here: http://ms-jd.org/my-mommy-wants-be-lawyer ) Despite the time lapse, I did not forget about Ms. JD and she was never very far from my thoughts. But I felt that I had contributed all that was worthy at that time and I needed to wait to accomplish something more profound or at least survive my first year of law school before I decided to wax more poetic about law school.So what happened? Well, a lot. Some things changed, but many things stayed the same.…

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didiscott

Center for Reproductive Rights and Columbia Law Announce New Fellowship

CENTER FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS ANNOUNCES NEW FELLOWSHIP WITH COLUMBIA LAW SCHOOL FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS LAW SCHOLARS NEW YORK–The Center for Reproductive Rights today announces a new fellowship with Columbia Law School for graduates pursuing legal academic careers in reproductive health and human rights. The Center-Columbia Fellow will be affiliated with both Columbia Law School and the Center, and will participate in the intellectual life of both programs. The Fellow will engage with the Center’s legal and policy projects, be a member of the Law School’s community of graduate fellows, and have work space at both locations. “We are thrilled to…

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cgrant

Choosing a Law School

Law school is as much about receiving an education as it is about networking and making connections, both in the intellectual and in the career-building sense. Going to a brand-named law school will open doors by name alone. However, are these doors, traditionally ones that open and close for men on men’s terms (see any number of writings about the glass ceiling or pink ghetto), the doors that women want to travel through? In my own law school application process, I visited about ten schools prior to applying (ranging from top tier to bottom tier). Those visits inspired me to…

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Anna

Weekly MILS Roundup (Moms in Law School)

The Moms in Law School Roundup posts on Sundays, alternating between blogs by PT-law mom and A Little Fish in Law School (a/k/a butterflyfish). This week is MILS #32, hosted by PT-law mom. It's an easy way to keep up with (and join) a virtual neighborhood of moms in law school! Thanks to butterflyfish for the tip in the comments [on our previous article about MILS]. Happy Sunday, everybody!

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Anna

Meet Stephanie Enyart and the National Association of Law Students with Disabilities [Clippings]

This month's issue of Student Lawyer, the ABA Student Division's magazine, profiles Stephanie Enyart in the article "Tackling Law School as a Blind Student." She's a 3L at UCLA and founding president of the National Association of Law Students with Disabilities. One of the group's goals is to develop a set of best practices to provide reasonable accommodations for law students with disabilities. We here at Ms. JD are all about best practices and improving the profession, so I wish them the best. If you have suggestions or interest, please visit nalswd.org. One of my classmates is blind (hi, T!)…

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Anna

Minority enrollment in law schools falters [Clippings]

Law.com reports that "Minority Enrollment at Law Schools Is Faltering." Leigh Jones of the National Law Journal speculates that "rankings pressure and anti-affirmative action may fuel the problem."Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Nebraska and Oklahoma all have initiatives under way to place questions on November ballots that would end programs that increase minority and female numbers in education and in government. [Emphasis added --Ed.]Vernellia Randall, professor at University of Dayton School of Law and author of the study America's Whitest Law Schools, fears "It's going to get worse before it gets better."

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