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victoriawillingham

Techlegality: The Intersection of Healthcare, Law, and Tech – Interview with Damika W. Barr

There is no question that technology is shaping the future of healthcare, especially now. I recently had the opportunity to sit down (virtually) with Damika W. Barr, Head of Public Policy and Government Relations at Verily Life Sciences. Wearing many titles, Damika is a wife, mother, attorney, thought leader, and healthcare champion. Throughout the course of our discussion, Damika shared great insight into her career path and how she navigates a role uniquely positioned at the intersection of healthcare, law, and technology. I enjoyed every moment of this interview, and I hope the same for you.  VW: Let’s get right…

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emilyandrews1

Criminal Justice Reform in New York: What to Expect in 2020?

Sweeping criminal justice reforms are coming to New York this year. Starting January 1, 2020, change is coming for the city's prosecutors and police that will force them to adjust their current practices. Here are some of the significant changes made on the criminal justice system to look out for. Bail Reform New state legislature on bail reform aims to reduce the number of people held in jail and the amount of time the system can keep them. People have been languishing in prisons such as Riker's Island and other facilities for years while waiting for their day in court.…

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lawyergirl

We are the phanthoms . we are not supposed to be here

  We are the phanthoms.we are not supposed to be here by Dr ilise L Feitshans JD and ScM and DIR  In the middle of the spring semester of second year law school when students have often successfully adjusted to the rigors of a difficult almost military austerity and discipline regime one professor chose to rattle the box of security his students had constructed so very carefully I don't know why I am here teaching constitutional law professor Roy Schotland proclaimed in his squeaky unsettling voice. None of you are going to argue before the Supreme Court The year was…

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vcstephens

Summer Associate Advice Good for a Lifetime: Solicit, Receive, and Materialize Constructive Feedback

Many leaders succeed in their fields because they request continuous feedback, process it, and adjust their course. As a law students, I attended panel discussions centered on soliciting feedback very frequently, so it seems like a hot-button topic for young associates. The legal field is incredibly challenging; the learning curve is steep and the workplace dynamics are intricate. I want to make continuous and open dialogue about my learning opportunities a regular part of my legal process,  so I talked to my mentors about how to request and receive actionable constructive feedback. Here are a few tips that I picked…

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kmiceli

The Happy Lawyer: A Year-Long Experiment

My last year of law school, I took a seminar class called “The Happy Lawyer”. The concept was simple; ten law students, one dean, and one professor read six books about happiness and discuss them over dinner throughout the school year. Full disclosure, I took this class because it was at the dean’s house (who doesn’t want to see their law school dean’s house?) and was taught by one of my favorite professors. The happiness and mindfulness aspect of the class was secondary at best.    Over the course of the year, we read six books including; Happiness: A Very…

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vcstephens

Learning the Securities Industry: Lessons from a Panel of Experts

This time last year, I developed a newfound love of securities law while I was studying for my Corporations final. Locked in a study room with my study partner, outlining the elements of classical insider trading and the misappropriation theory, I discovered an area of law that was new and very interesting to me. The following semester, I enrolled in a mix of business and securities law classes to learn more about the intersections between the two areas. I even enrolled in accounting (which I found fascinating).  Despite having worked at the Securities and Exchange Commission as an Honors Intern…

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kmiceli

Unpaid Internships: A Garbage and Discriminatory Legal Practice

Do you want to know the best-kept secret in the legal community? Unpaid internships. In my last blog post, I mentioned that I had four unpaid internships in law school. I received several stunned responses from friends outside the legal community, specifically those in business school. I thought it was common knowledge that many law student internships are unpaid. Spoiler alert: it’s not. For those outside the legal community, here are two important things you should know. One, it is very common for law students to work full-time, unpaid internships during the summer and school year. Two, law students are…

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kmiceli

What To Do When Your School Can’t Help You Get a Policy Job

In law school, I had an amazing party trick. The first month of school everyone was asking the three standard questions. “What’s your name?” “Where are you from?” And finally, “what do you want to practice?” The first two elicited pretty typical responses. But, the third was my astounding trick. Instead of saying I wanted to be a prosecutor or a civil litigator, I said I wanted to work in policy. Brows furrowed. Jaws dropped. Panic flickered in their eyes. They could not understand why someone would suffer the three-year torture of law school to never see the inside of…

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claireeparsons

Why Women Lawyers Should Consider Service on a Public Board or Commission

This week, a historic number of women were elected to Congress and a record number of women ran in and won other races nationwide. If I had to pick a single word to describe this situation, it would be this: awesome. We need more women and diverse voices in government. But what you may not have heard about in the coverage of the recent elections is that the need to increase the representation of women extends to unelected government positions as well.  In particular, women do not make up a fair proportion of the people serving on state and local…

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KatMacfarlane

Pushed & Pulled: The Kavanaugh Effect

It was not an easy week, last week. I don’t have it in me to tell you how my disability affected my work, because though it certainly did, as it always does, I was pulled in multiple directions by something else. I was both teacher and witness, professor and person. It was not an easy week to be all of those things. It was not easy to decide what to do on the day of the hearings. Should I cancel class, encouraging my students to watch history unfold, a history that speaks to their future as members of the legal…

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