Browse Topics

vcstephens

Summer Associate Advice Good for a Lifetime: Solicit, Receive, and Materialize Constructive Feedback

Many leaders succeed in their fields because they request continuous feedback, process it, and adjust their course. As a law students, I attended panel discussions centered on soliciting feedback very frequently, so it seems like a hot-button topic for young associates. The legal field is incredibly challenging; the learning curve is steep and the workplace dynamics are intricate. I want to make continuous and open dialogue about my learning opportunities a regular part of my legal process,  so I talked to my mentors about how to request and receive actionable constructive feedback. Here are a few tips that I picked…

read more

kmiceli

The Happy Lawyer: A Year-Long Experiment

My last year of law school, I took a seminar class called “The Happy Lawyer”. The concept was simple; ten law students, one dean, and one professor read six books about happiness and discuss them over dinner throughout the school year. Full disclosure, I took this class because it was at the dean’s house (who doesn’t want to see their law school dean’s house?) and was taught by one of my favorite professors. The happiness and mindfulness aspect of the class was secondary at best.    Over the course of the year, we read six books including; Happiness: A Very…

read more

vcstephens

Learning the Securities Industry: Lessons from a Panel of Experts

This time last year, I developed a newfound love of securities law while I was studying for my Corporations final. Locked in a study room with my study partner, outlining the elements of classical insider trading and the misappropriation theory, I discovered an area of law that was new and very interesting to me. The following semester, I enrolled in a mix of business and securities law classes to learn more about the intersections between the two areas. I even enrolled in accounting (which I found fascinating).  Despite having worked at the Securities and Exchange Commission as an Honors Intern…

read more

kmiceli

Unpaid Internships: A Garbage and Discriminatory Legal Practice

Do you want to know the best-kept secret in the legal community? Unpaid internships. In my last blog post, I mentioned that I had four unpaid internships in law school. I received several stunned responses from friends outside the legal community, specifically those in business school. I thought it was common knowledge that many law student internships are unpaid. Spoiler alert: it’s not. For those outside the legal community, here are two important things you should know. One, it is very common for law students to work full-time, unpaid internships during the summer and school year. Two, law students are…

read more

kmiceli

What To Do When Your School Can’t Help You Get a Policy Job

In law school, I had an amazing party trick. The first month of school everyone was asking the three standard questions. “What’s your name?” “Where are you from?” And finally, “what do you want to practice?” The first two elicited pretty typical responses. But, the third was my astounding trick. Instead of saying I wanted to be a prosecutor or a civil litigator, I said I wanted to work in policy. Brows furrowed. Jaws dropped. Panic flickered in their eyes. They could not understand why someone would suffer the three-year torture of law school to never see the inside of…

read more

claireeparsons

Why Women Lawyers Should Consider Service on a Public Board or Commission

This week, a historic number of women were elected to Congress and a record number of women ran in and won other races nationwide. If I had to pick a single word to describe this situation, it would be this: awesome. We need more women and diverse voices in government. But what you may not have heard about in the coverage of the recent elections is that the need to increase the representation of women extends to unelected government positions as well.  In particular, women do not make up a fair proportion of the people serving on state and local…

read more

KatMacfarlane

Pushed & Pulled: The Kavanaugh Effect

It was not an easy week, last week. I don’t have it in me to tell you how my disability affected my work, because though it certainly did, as it always does, I was pulled in multiple directions by something else. I was both teacher and witness, professor and person. It was not an easy week to be all of those things. It was not easy to decide what to do on the day of the hearings. Should I cancel class, encouraging my students to watch history unfold, a history that speaks to their future as members of the legal…

read more

dennis.w.hung@gmail.com

You Graduated From Law School… Now What?

One mistake you don't want to make when graduating from law school is to assume that having a major law degree will have clients knocking on your door or local firms immediately hiring you. In fact, the field of law is actually one of the most competitive in the US and law school graduates have their work cut out for them. In today's competitive climate, you have to have flexibility when it comes to geography, a fine attention to details when it comes to compiling a resume, and most importantly, a willingness to take the kind of work that's available.…

read more

admin@immigrationslaw.com

10 Ways to Help Immigrant Children Separated from Parents

With immigration tragedies playing out across America, many lawyers and students are searching for constructive actions they can take. Here our immigration lawyers review some of the best ways to help refugees and immigrant children separated from their families. While it is unclear exactly how many immigrant children have been separated from their parents, the US government has so far been unable to comply with federal court orders to reunite the children they have separated from their parents. The heart wrenching images and stories have ignited an immigration firestorm and prompted the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, based in Geneva to declare the…

read more

dennis.w.hung@gmail.com

Careers You Can Pursue With A Law Degree

Achieving a law degree is no small feat. The schooling is difficult and requires you to study hard and work harder. The benefit, however, is that a law degree allows you to pursue nearly any career path you want. Here are a few of the most common careers you can choose from. 1. Law Firms Perhaps the most obvious choice is a law firm. Working as an attorney has its benefits. Not only does it pay great, but you're actually able to utilize the education you received in school. There's a number of different fields within the firm from which…

read more

 1 2 3 >  Last ›

Join Us

Contribute to our blog and join the discussion.

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Newsletter

Enter your email address to receive regular updates, news, and events.

Connect with us

Follow or subscribe