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claireeparsons

How to Get Leadership Positions to Build Your Practice

Ask most experienced attorneys how they built their practice and they’ll tell you they “got involved” in the community or professional organizations. Maybe this advice doesn’t always use the term “leadership” but that’s what it means. If you really want to “get involved” and build your reputation, you need to do some real work rather than just paying a membership fee and adding your name to a list. This may be a little scary for young attorneys, since it is easy to think that you haven’t paid your dues long enough to qualify as a leader. It may be easy to…

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ktran227

The Double Glass Ceiling: A barrier to female and minority retention

One reason for the inability of law firms to keep their female and minority lawyers may come down to two words: business development.  Or more accurately, business generation and the lack thereof.  I met a female in house counsel at a conference last fall.  She had gone in house after 8 years in a law firm.  I asked her what made her go in house and her answer was that she had been practicing in a very niche practice at her firm that wasn’t easy for her to develop her own business.  I asked other female in house counsel at the…

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jennyrpatten

Do Your Part: Contributing to Company Culture as Legal Counsel

Over the past couple of months, we’ve explored the importance of company culture in your in-house practice and how to identify whether a company’s culture is the right fit for you.  This month’s column wraps up my short series on culture with how in-house counsel can use your unique role within the company to promote positive aspects of your company’s culture. Think about the leadership of your company, or the company you support.  While the C-suite executives serve as the formal leaders of the company, you likely have a series of informal leadership within the company as well.  These individuals…

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Caambridge

So You Are Thinking About Law School?

If you browse the internet, you will find many sources providing information on topics from “things you should know before going to law school” to “things I wish I knew before law school” and many of these articles seem to all have a common theme where they stress the importance of doing your research. While there are many sources including entertaining YouTube videos where you can follow a law student in “A Day in their Life,” I thought I’d provide you with one more informative article on what you should know if you are thinking about attending law school. 1.…

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mjtimko13

Something Blue: Bringing Blue-Collar Roots to the Legal Profession - An Interview with Melissa Green

For this month's post, I am thrilled to feature an interview with Melissa Green, an energetic, enthusiastic, and compassionate attorney who specializes in Social Security Disability law.  Melissa is the daughter of blue-collar workers and the first person in her family to attend and graduate from both college and law school.   Could you tell Ms. JD blog readers about your background and what prompted you to apply to law school? I grew up in rural Maine and was the first person in my family to attend college.  After college I became a high school teacher for about six years, then applied to law…

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Millennial Women

The Importance of Community Involvement

As millennials, we are more interconnected than ever—with a variety of social media platforms and constantly evolving technology at our fingertips. It’s easy to  connect with someone on LinkedIn, or follow them on Twitter,  but this month, we wanted to highlight something else—beyond online connectivity—that’s important to a lot of millennials for both personal and professional reasons: in-person, community involvement. Community involvement can take several different forms, and any activity that helps you get plugged into your community and meet people is time well spent. We’ve reflected on some of the community activities and involvement that we’ve been a part…

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Ifeoma81

Millennial Women: Estate Planning is for You Too!

Millennial Lawyers are Powerful. I can say that because I too am a millennial lawyer. We are highly educated (sometimes in the school of hard knocks), talented, committed, innovative and ready to take on any challenge head-on. Watch out! The world is changing for women and millennials are leading the way for future generations: Around 72% of millennial women are in the workforce. [i] Although a gender pay gap still exists but is narrowing. [ii] More than 28% of millennial women start a business because they see an opportunity. [iii] Millennial women are more likely to have bachelor degrees than their male…

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XpYmu98NtP

The Mental Load: There’s No App for Work-Life Balance…but Property Law Might Help

Whether you’re on team Sandberg or team Slaughter, you’ve probably realized by now that nobody “has it all”. Exhibit A: Michelle Obama's candid slip when discussing techniques for achieving the elusive work-life balance: “That $%#& doesn’t work all the time.” Despite the polarizing opinions on work-life balance (or work-life integration, if you prefer), there’s one thing all women have in common: we want things to be better, both collectively and individually. But with an overabundance of advice on how to get something that we've established doesn’t actually exist, it’s easy to feel like this whole dialogue is muddling into meaningless mush…

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kmiceli

The Happy Lawyer: A Year-Long Experiment

My last year of law school, I took a seminar class called “The Happy Lawyer”. The concept was simple; ten law students, one dean, and one professor read six books about happiness and discuss them over dinner throughout the school year. Full disclosure, I took this class because it was at the dean’s house (who doesn’t want to see their law school dean’s house?) and was taught by one of my favorite professors. The happiness and mindfulness aspect of the class was secondary at best.    Over the course of the year, we read six books including; Happiness: A Very…

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stephanietheother85

More Value, Less Time: Being A Giver Does Not Mean Overextending Yourself

Last month, we discussed the importance of being a giver when networking.  A common follow-up question is how to be a giver but also not overextend yourself.  Here are some ways that you can continue to build relationships, add value, and be a giver when networking, but not stretch yourself too thin that you become overwhelmed or give up altogether. Set Realistic Goals Many times, after you’ve made the decision to invest in your professional development you want to dive in full-speed.  As with most things we approach this way, the momentum will only take us so far.  Setting goals…

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