Anna

Lawyers with Depression [Clippings]

The website Lawyers With Depression is six months old this February. Started by Dan Lukasik, a partner at Cantor Lukasik Dolce & Panepinto in Buffalo, New York. Last month he told the ABA Journal, "I felt like most lawyers think--'I can deal with it by myself.' But it got to the point where I really couldn’t."One of every five lawyers (20%) are suffering from depression at any given time. That's three times the rate of depression among the general U.S. population (6.7%). Perhaps not surprisingly, a recent survey of Oregon attorneys found that the same portion (20%, or 1 in…

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Anna

DirectWomen Board Institute trains senior attorneys to serve on corporate boards

If you or a senior attorney you know would like to serve on a corporate board, you'll want to know about the DirectWomen Board Institute. DirectWomen is a little over a year old--it started around the same time as Ms. JD. While a lot of our stuff focuses on the front end of legal careers (for students and associates), DirectWomen works on the back end (retiring business attorneys). The ABA-sponsored initiative means "to identify, develop, and support a select group of accomplished women attorneys to provide qualified directors needed by the boards of U.S. companies." DirectWomen does three main things:1.…

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Anna

Meet Stephanie Enyart and the National Association of Law Students with Disabilities [Clippings]

This month's issue of Student Lawyer, the ABA Student Division's magazine, profiles Stephanie Enyart in the article "Tackling Law School as a Blind Student." She's a 3L at UCLA and founding president of the National Association of Law Students with Disabilities. One of the group's goals is to develop a set of best practices to provide reasonable accommodations for law students with disabilities. We here at Ms. JD are all about best practices and improving the profession, so I wish them the best. If you have suggestions or interest, please visit nalswd.org. One of my classmates is blind (hi, T!)…

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Anna

‘“Would I be more employable with a baby on my knee?” [Clippings]

Over at her think like a woman. act like a man. blog, Anastasia wonders, "Would I be more employable with a baby on my knee?" I'm a little slow posting the link, but we spend so much time talking about motherhood here at Ms. JD that I wanted to make sure to mention it. You see, Ana doesn't want to get married, or find a life-partner, or have a child.I am always happier when I am uncoupled. There is no great career aspiration that supersedes a biological drive. Break-ups from long relationships always bring a joyous sense of relief for…

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Anna

Solo by Choice: How to Be the Lawyer You Always Wanted to Be [Clippings]

Sometime Ms. JD blogger and ever-faithful friend of the solo practitioner Carolyn Elefant has written a new book, Solo by Choice: How to Be the Lawyer You Always Wanted to Be. As a solo practitioner and a regular contributor to law.com, she is an expert on the subject and a woman successfully forging her own path in the legal profession. I haven't had a chance to read the book, but Susan Carter Liebel (another Ms. JD contributor, who also knows her stuff about building a solo practice) says it's "a good reference book filled with great information aggregated in one…

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Anna

Children’s Books Featuring Working Moms and Families Who Juggle [Clippings]

Looking for role models more modern than Disney princesses? Sara Schaefer Munoz over at the Juggle Blog asked readers, "Where are the Working Parents in Children’s Literature?" Responses suggest and describe a number of children's books and DVDs. The Ramona series by Beverly Cleary (featuring two working parents) is one of my favorites, especially Ramona and Her Mother.

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Anna

Five Tips for Commuting While Pregnant (and Afterward)

If you missed it, on Friday the Wall Street Journal Juggle blog asked readers to comment on commuting while pregnant. What resulted was a long, long thread of horror stories (from pregnant women forced to stand for long subway rides while fellow passengers feigned sleep) punctuated with a few friendlier tales and lot of people admonishing each other to be more courteous. If you are looking for commiseration, head to the Juggle blog. If you are looking for solutions, just scroll down! I read through the thread to glean tips for Ms. JD readers. Five tips for commuting while pregnant…

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Anna

Preventing Violence Against Law Profs

Tracy McGaugh at Feminist Law Profs reviews a piece coauthored by Carol Parker, U. Tennessee-Knoxville College of Law: "Anger and Violence on Campus: Recommendations for Legal Educators." In the wake of the latest university shooting--at Northern Illinois U last week--Parker's recommendations feel especially timely. The article, which is publicly available on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN), outlines predictors of violent behavior and policies for violence prevention. Most of the policies require enactment by school administrations--these aren't risks that profs can manage entirely on their own. The article, McGaugh explains, touches on the almost-taboo topic of junior faculty members who…

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Anna

How to Avoid Crying at Work [Part 3 of 3]

In previous posts (Part 1 and Part 2), I outlined eight ways to avoid crying at work. The techniques were mainly preventive, although some of them could also be used to hurry past tears after you've started crying. (In such situations, for instance, it might still help to take a step back or focus on your breathing.) My last four tips are different. They won't help you completely avoid crying. These are last resorts for handling tears that come out despite your best efforts. · Forge ahead· Just ignore it· Deflect with a white lie· Be honest and direct Different…

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Anna

How to Avoid Crying at Work [Part 2 of 3]

Previously I described four ways to avoid crying at work: focusing on your breathing, taking a step back, cauterizing your tear ducts, and distracting yourself with pain. Here are four more tricks for preventing tears...· Use props · Let yourself get angry· Try behavioral modification· Do it for somebody else An explanation of when, how, and why each technique works follows after the jump... 5. Use props.Prepare an agenda for your meeting, a physical piece of paper that you can set on the desk in front of you or hold in your hands. If that doesn't fit the situation, you…

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