Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  You Are More Than Your Grades

December marks the end of the first semester of law school.  Many law students are – or have been – taking exams around now.  There are many exam taking tips out there.  For example, at my school, professors have offered tips here, here, and here.  I would add one more to those:  Relax.  It may seem odd to say “relax,” but I think “relax” is an important exam taking tip that is often overlooked.  For weeks now, students have been outlining, reviewing their outlines and texts, and meeting with study groups to go over concepts.  All of that work is…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  Wearing the Blues

Often, most particularly in the fall semester, I tend to see a lot of students wandering the law school in professional dress.  Some students are interviewing for jobs, but others are heading to or coming from their internships or clerkships.  The most obvious thing about all these students is the lack of color in their wardrobes; there’s a lot of black, grey, and navy.  The second most obvious thing is that they all look the same; conservative cut suits and button down shirts. Admittedly, for men, the choices for professional dress are limited.  A suit is a suit.  Jackets have…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  Falling Leaves and Rising Stress Levels?

Here in the Midwest, the leaves are changing, the nights are cool, and there’s a nip in the air in the early mornings.  That means it’s October, which means for most law students that school has been in session for nearly two months (for most students).  It’s around this time that the 1Ls perhaps notice an increase in workload.  Now there’s not just reading and briefing for class – which may be clipping along more quickly now – but probably assignments due in their writing classes.  All along, in the background, 1Ls are hearing people talk about “getting those outlines…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor: The Making of a Law Professor

There’s an adage in law that claims that the students who earned As in law school become law professors, the students who earned Bs become partners, and the students who earned Cs become judges. I can’t verify that the adage is correct, but there is some truth to the first part. Typically law professors had excellent law school grades. But that’s not all. They often members of their school’s law review, and most have held at least one – sometimes two – judicial clerkships. A good number also spent a couple of years in practice. As my colleague Gordon Hylton…

read more

Lisamaze214
Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  The Constitutional Equality of Women

     For young women coming of age today, their equality with men seems assured.  As youngsters they’ve played on co-ed sports teams; they’ve often been more successful than boys in school; they’ve pursued careers in previously male-dominated fields like math and science, medicine and law.  For them, women have always been able to vote, abortion has always been legal, and women have reached high places in politics.  Many probably have mothers (and fathers) who came of age during and after the second wave of feminism, believing they would raise their daughters to believe in their capacity to be equal citizens.    …

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  The Socratic Method as Law School Pedagogy – Does it Exclude Voices?

            Even though it is mid-summer, and the school year seems far away yet, I find myself thinking about the Socratic method as it is used in law school.  (This is undoubtedly due to my taking a summer course in philosophy, where I read several original Socratic dialogues.)  And when I think of the Socratic method and law school, I cannot help but think of Professor Kingsfield, the notorious contracts professor in The Paper Chase.  The various classroom scenes where Professor Kingsfield grills student after student on classic contracts cases like Hawkins v. McGee have for years served as a…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  Moving from Law School to Law Practice

In the past month, thousands of law students have graduated from their respective law schools.  They will spend this summer studying for bar exams and possibly looking for work.  Most are probably ecstatic that law school is behind them and “real” legal work is ahead.  Perhaps, though, in August when their classmates begin to gear up for classes these graduates will have a moment of feeling left out – a sense of emptiness because for  years their lives have run on an academic calendar that will no longer apply to them. But what of the transition from law school to law…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  The Best Kind of Learning

This semester, I taught a seminar on Gender and the Law.  This was the very first time I taught this course, and I was so curious about how it would turn out.  After registrations and drops, the seminar had 12 students – 11 women and one man.  Through the semester, we discussed myriad topics about women and the law, following the order in our text, but not necessarily limiting ourselves to the text.  I structured the seminar in a way a former colleague had structured it when she taught it many years before at my school, and in a way…

read more

Lisamaze214

Ponderings of a Law Professor:  It’s (Still) a Man’s, Man’s World

We’ve come a long way, baby.  Sort of.  In 1970, women were not quite 9% of law students nationwide.  Now, we are almost half of all law students and law graduates, yet we represent only one-third of all lawyers and fewer than 20% of the partners in law firms and general counsel for Fortune 500 companies.  In fact, according to Susan Smith Blakely, author of Best Friends at the Bar:  What Women Need to Know about a Career in Law, 46% of women leave the practice of law mid-career.  So how far have we come, really?Blakely, a recent speaker at…

read more

 1 2 > 

Become a Member

FREE online community for women in the legal profession.

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive regular updates, news, and events from Ms. JD.

Connect with us

Follow or subscribe