Manamana

No Pressure - Just Be Perfect

Editor's Note: As part of Ms. JD's 5th Birthday celebration, we'll be looking back at our favorite posts over the years. Exactly four years ago one of our founding bloggers submitted this great post. Our board easily identified it as a "Best of" that still rings true today. I was having a great weekend (given that Ms. JD had its national launch at Yale Law School on Saturday) when I opened up my Sunday Times. Great, I thought: just as was noted in Ms. JD’s presentation at the start of Legally Female, The New York Times has gone six months…

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Manamana

Two Articles of Interest

Two articles came out this week that I thought were pretty interesting. The New York Times’ article, “Poor Behavior is Linked to Time in Day Care” sparks anger, guilt (note the title: “Am I Hurting My Child With Day Care?”),

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Manamana

Hi.  I’m an addict.

Confession time: I’m an email addict. Seriously. I have five email addresses that I constantly check most days (it tends to die down a little between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning). I think I probably spend most of my “working time” composing and answering emails, particularly since I have gone far enough into my law school career to be somewhat indifferent to reading for class. By the end of the week, I’m so sick of emailing that I have even been able to overcome my long-standing, deeply-rooted aversion to the phone, and starting ringing people up. Most of what is…

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Manamana

“The Opt-Out Myth” by E.J. Graff

Here's a very interesting article by E.J. Graff in the Columbia Journalism Review entitled "The Opt-Out Myth." It is partly a response to Lisa Belkin's article "The Opt Out Revolution" that came out in the New York Times magazine in 2003 and other similar articles that have been coming out on the topic (the Times, for instance, appears to feel compelled to publish such pieces every six months or so). "The Opt-Out Myth" highlights the problems with framing this topic in this way, and pushes back on some conventional wisdom that usually attends these discussions: "The moms-go-home story keeps coming…

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Manamana

Beyond Balance—Changing the Construct

There’s some very interesting discussions going on in this blog and elsewhere about work-life balance (see Jessie’s “Waste Not, Want Not?”; Carolyn Elefant’s “The Importance of Planning a Career,” and all the fabulous comments these have generated). To say nothing of entire blogs devoted to the topic (such as The WSJ’s The Juggle by Sara Schaefer Muñoz). So I’m adding something else into the mix: Beyond Balance, A Legal Sanity Learning Programs Eguide PDF, by Lori Herz and Arnie Herz, who blog over at Legal Sanity. Similar to

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Manamana

To ring or not to ring?

I know that my school's career services office has its own line on this question (do what you feel comfortable with), but the ring dilemma seems to come up every interview season. The WSJ blog The Juggle has posted on this here, and it seems there are many opinions out there. Basically, there is no real bright line rule, which indicates the question will linger on. (I also recommend checking out the post's comments, which include many from lawyers and former lawyers.) Has anyone here had negative (or positive) ring experiences in interviews? Or does it really not matter (as…

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Manamana

Sure, you passed the bar, but are you relationship material?

Valentine’s Day has already passed, and this is therefore coming late, but I was interested in this post two weeks ago in the Wall Street Journal’s Law Blog entitled “Lawyers in Love” (this was the second part of a two-part series; the first was the lyrics of a 1983 song by Jackson Browne, which I will spare you). A lot of the more “life” posts at this blog and others are frequently externally oriented, by which I mean they are focused outward (towards employers, towards institutions, towards spouses or significant others) with their observations and comments. I don’t mean to…

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Manamana

Federalists v. women?

While not reading for class tomorrow I came across this post at Feminist Law Professors, pointing out the lack of women in the Federalist Society’s 2007 Student Symposium. My count confirms that out of 19 panelists, 16 are men and 3 are women; of 6 moderators, 5 are men. Needless to say, the keynote speaker is a man. As my original source pointedly points out, the Federalists’ counterpoint, the American Constitutional Society, had much better numbers at their 2006 symposium. (I’ll admit I didn’t count, because there were many more speakers, but informally looking at the brochure reveals at least…

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Manamana

Sexy Legal Advertising

By a 2L at NYU School of Law Back in November, a minor controversy erupted in Boston over an ad placed by Jiwani, a maker of custom-tailored suits, in the Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly (here is a link through Abovethelaw.com to the picture Is this ad in the same vein as the Clinique ‘cum’ shot discussed by Frank Herbert in the New York Times (see his October 16, 2006 editorial “Why Aren't We Shocked?” discussing wide-spread misogyny in our society)? Is the woman in this ad a mere sexual plaything? That is the easy argument—just survey the obvious signs: she is…

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Manamana

AmLaw thinks practice area matters a lot (more) for female lawyers. Discuss.

Following up on "Obstacle Course" in the American Lawyer (which the WSJ’s Law Blog has linked and commented on the article in their post Women Litigators Battle Adversity and Stereotypes): The AmLaw article’s main contention is that female litigators have it even harder than not only other (male) litigators, but also by implication female corporate lawyers. I think this notion—litigation is very hard (the hardest?) in terms of balancing personal and professional life—is one that has a lot of traction in the workplace. That is why the article doesn’t even bother to come out and say what they’re getting at,…

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