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Ms. JD is Now Accepting Applications for Its 2017 Writers in Residence Program!

LSATs, law school studies, hectic work weeks. Sometimes we all need a creative outlet.  Whether you are pre-law, currently in law school, or a seasoned legal professional, Ms. JD may have just the opportunity for you!  Ms. JD is currently seeking applications for its 2017 Writers in Residence Program.  Started in 2010, the Writers in Residence are a select group of pre-law individuals, current law students, and legal professionals who contribute monthly articles for one year to the Ms. JD blog on a topic of their choosing. This year's Writers addressed many interesting and relatable issues facing everyone from pre-law millennials to…

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Month 12: Go out with a bang.

By the end of the year at my previous job, I made up my mind to start my own firm. (See my previous post). All that was left to do was to announce my resignation. This was my first time quitting a big job (not counting times I quit my summer jobs when I was in high school and college) so I definitely needed to prepare what to say, although I would recommend in general that you should prepare for any type of meeting like this. It was a little tricky to schedule a time to sit down with my boss…

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Month 11: Don’t get too comfortable (Part 2), create your own opportunities

Turn on your computer, register in various employment websites, read emails from your law school's career counselor, visit your law school's job bank, visit other law schools' job bank, visit law firm websites and look up their hiring coordinators, update your LinkedIn profile, look for jobs on LinkedIn... sound familiar? Too many of us go through this process to look for jobs nowadays. I think it's actually more difficult to find jobs a year or two out of law school than it is when you've just graduated and passed the bar. Usually job posts specify that employers look for 3+, 5+…

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Month 10: Don’t get too comfortable (Part 1), build that resume.

Since the first day of law school, I was so fixated on finding a job. After all, that's why we all go to school, right? Get a great education, find a high paying job, pay off our student loans? There was this one girl in my class who had a "guaranteed job" even before she started school because she came from a family of reputable lawyers. I was super jealous and envious of her. Why couldn't I not worry about finding a job. Fast forward a few years later, I landed on my first "real" job as a lawyer. I was super stoked…

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Month 9: If you’re upset, do something about it.

I’ve noticed that a lot of people have complaints about their job but people rarely say or do anything about it. And if they do, it mostly involves complaining to their colleagues, family, and friends, and not much more. I think this is because many people are afraid to talk to their bosses or supervisors, or because they feel like they’re not in a position to make any difference.  During my previous job, my boss decided to implement a “mandatory Saturday” policy where people had to come into work to catch up on work. A lot of people were not…

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Month 8: Leave your personal life at home.

Last year, there was a huge scandal at my office that kept everyone talking for months and months. It started a few months into the job, but people continued to talk about it by the time I left, and I wouldn’t be surprised if people are still talking about it now.  Without going into too much detail, the scandal involved an attorney and a staff member at the office. They were not very discrete and they certainly didn’t do much to stop fueling the fire on the rumors.    The scandal was entertaining to some people for sure, but it…

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Month 7: It’s time for some recognition.

It's summer time! The weather is nice and you're cooped up in your office, working hard. Actually, you've been working hard. But do your co-workers know? And more importantly, does your boss know? It doesn’t do you any good to come to work, shut your office door, and sit behind your desk all day (working through lunch). You have to get out, and talk to people about what you’re doing so you’re seen and heard. Besides, it never hurts to socialize a little bit with your co-workers. And in turn, you may find out about what your co-workers are up…

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Month 6: Be nice to your support staff.

It goes without saying, you need a good secretary or a paralegal to help you with your everyday tasks and keep you sane.  I went through three different secretaries during my last job, which meant that I needed to train each one when they were newly hired. Wait, let me clarify that. I wasn’t exactly tasked to train the secretaries, but it became a necessity to teach them how to do their jobs because none of them really had any experience. But it’s tough to train your staff. Not only are you busy with the work that you already have,…

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Month 5: It’s feedback time.

Some people insist that they love getting feedback, but they get really defensive when you give them feedback. While I don't particularly love getting feedback, I do understand the importance of it and it is nice for me to receive it every now and then. For the most part, I receive pretty positive feedback from my clients, but there was this one time when I recieved a small complaint about one of the forms I generated for work. I remember this complaint vividly because this was the first complaint that I officially received from a client, and it's hard to forget your first.  This form that…

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Month 4: Do your job right, and some clients won’t like it.

As a first-year attorney, I was always paranoid about doing everything “correctly” and by the book. I was not only worried about being reprimanded at work for mistakes I could avoid, but more importantly, I was adamant about not committing malpractice and losing my license to practice (aka my worst nightmare).  For these reasons, I was careful when talking to clients, measuring every word, and making sure I thought about my responses. One day, I was talking to a client about preparing his patent application. Unfortunately, this guy was unable to provide me with sufficient information for me to prepare…

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