JMLiebman

Blog Article

Bringing the Women Back: Law School Paves the Way for Women in the Profession

I am no stranger to classrooms where one gender radically outnumbers the other. My undergraduate college continues to maintain a ratio of 1 man for every 3 women despite going co-ed four decades ago. As a graduate student in philosophy, I usually found myself just one of only 2 or 3 women in 20 person seminars. I entered law school at the University of Illinois eager for a more balanced classroom. I knew that most first tier schools have a 45/55 split in genders favoring men. Having long ago learned to hold my own in a variety of educational environments,…

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Anonymous

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Licenciada: A Latina’s Perspective on Entering the Legal Community

Two years ago, I had my first experience with what I call the Stupid White Male ("SWM"), a creature not limited to the legal community, but often prevalent in it. At the time, I was working as a legal secretary on a temporary basis, as my admission to law school had been deferred for a year. The SWM was a summer associate who had just finished his 1L year, and after I explained to him how to use the office copier, I mentioned my admission to the law school. His response was something to the effect of, "oh yeah, well…

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Nora Farah

Blog Article

Two Kinds of Law Students: High-Roller Helens and Justice Janets

I am convinced that there are only two categories of law students on the first day of student orientation: the High-Roller Helens and Justice Janets. Helens have a million reasons why they want to be attorneys, all of which they accept in the form of cash, credit, or check. Helens are competitive and sneer at the prospect of being anything less than a corporate defense attorney, making the "big-bucks." Helens practically cannot have children, but they typically have all the toys they desire. Janets, on the other hand, want to become lawyers so that they may fight for truth, justice,…

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Tiffany Crane

Blog Article

Sometimes life interferes with being the perfect law student. What happens after that?

I walked in, confidently shook Mr. Partner's hand and sat down. He politely tossed my resume aside and said, "What advice can I give you about interviewing with a smaller firm? My firm would never consider you."Loyola University New Orleans has a strong contingent of women lawyers working in Career Services who are particularly attuned to the issues facing female law students as we search for employment opportunities. This was something that I took for granted until my second year of law school when I began to see some of the statistics brought to life in my own quest to…

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jessie

Blog Article

Opt-Out Continued

Remember Lisa Belkin of "Opt-Out Revolution" fame? Well now Ms. Belkin has published another piece on "stalling" career women. This time the focus is on small business owners. According to the Center for Women's Business Research, of the 10.4 million business owned by women, only 3% have an annual revenue exceeding $1 million. Belkin's article profiles a number of microenterprise groups trying to increase that number. To be fair, Belkin does include the view of Marsha Firestone, founder of the Women Presidents' Organization, who finds the term and idea of "stalled" career women is "a little insulting." I think this…

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Elizabeth

Blog Article

Shifting Expectations: Women Less Inclined to Pursue Legal Careers

Leigh Jones has an article entitled Fewer Women Are Seeking Law Degrees in the National Law Journal this week. She cites statistics that since 2002 the percentage of women attending law school has declined every year from 49% in 2002 to 46.9% this year. Of course, the total number of applicants to law school has also declined in the past two years with female applicants for 2006 falling by 7.7% and male applicants by 6.7% (Jones has an interesting graph illustrating this phenomenon in her article). At least partly due to the drop in female applicants, the number of women…

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Carol Simpson

Blog Article

Avoiding burnout on the Death Row defense bar

Each week during our internship, the legal staff has an “Intern CLE,” or some sort of legal lecture. Sometimes we watch a video on some aspect of public interest law, followed by a Q&A with an attorney practicing in that field. It may be someone working in criminal defense, legal aid, a lobbyist, or a legislative aide. We even watched Good Night, and Good Luck. The interns get to learn a little about other areas of public interest law, and can network with attorneys in other non-profits. And it serves as a little break in an otherwise intensive work week.We…

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Tahanie Aboushi

Blog Article

The Expectations Game

As a woman, the most important expectations to fill are my own. I vow to never compare myself to a man and to never make him my standard.As a child my parents always told me there was nothing I could not do. They also told me to never let anyone say or convince me I could not do something. More importantly, I was taught to always look for a challenge and never take the easy way out. Being a woman has become synonymous with challenge. As a woman entering the legal profession I am a reflection of our entire race,…

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Victoria Tsoong

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Perspective: From a women’s college to a co-ed law class

Coming directly from a women's college to law school, I confronted an unexpected hurtle--a co-ed classroom. In my youth, I attended co-ed schools, but was fortunate to take the opportunity to attend Scripps College of the Claremont Colleges. During college, I was able to gain confidence as a woman and was able to understand what it meant to be a woman in society. I emerged from Scripps confident and independent. Despite the lessons learned from a women's college, I found that, even in this day and age, the legal realm is still adapting to women in executive positions. I had…

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Anonymous

Blog Article

My Dream Firm

Daydreams of the perfect firm--from a public interest lawyer who found existing firms too flawed to join.Being a woman entering the legal profession is something that I think about often, although as a young girl growing up, it is a topic I never imagined I would have to consider. Growing up in the 1980s, girls were empowered to try to both outsmart and outrun boys as we played on their sports teams and competed against them in academic competitions. We watched our mothers or our friends' mothers work. We were groomed to go to college before we settled down to…

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